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Macmillan
(@dylan-macmillan)
MP for North East Bedfordshire
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 256
08/03/2019 11:56 am  

It is extremely worrying to learn that the Labour Party are risking Scottish Independence by making membership of the campaign to remain in the UK a party political issue. Labour are so desperate to win the next election, whenever it is, that they would risk the breakup of our union to try and shave a couple of points off of the SNP's vote share. These moves are shameful, they threaten the disintegration of the United Kingdom, and they show once and for all that the Labour Party are only interested in power.

Conservative MP for North East Bedfordshire
Leader of the Opposition

Prime Minister (2014)

Parliamentary Experience: Unknown (14)
Media Experience: Capable (45)
Policy Experience: Unknown (13)


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Wilder
(@wilder)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 23
08/03/2019 4:12 pm  

When the crucial moment approaches in the Scottish referendum, the way forward for success is to ensure that all parties are working together, regardless of your affiliation, for the preservation of the Union. There is a fundamental truth to the Better Together campaign- that Scotland is stronger as a part of the United Kingdom, and just as importantly, the United Kingdom is stronger with Scotland as a member. Of course, this is the democratic process, and that must be allowed to play out- but we should be working together, across the aisle, to ensure that there is an emphatic show of support for the Union in the Fall.

Labour’s thoughts of leaving the Better Together campaign shows they are putting immediate political expediency at the expense of the long-term future of the Union. Make no qualms about it- they saw that they did not like their polling, and instead of responding in a way that could help unify people, they are considering drastic action that threaten the future of the Union altogether. I call upon Labour leadership to heed the concerns of those within their own party, and to stick up and fight for the Union.  

Nathan Wilder
Conservative Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North
Secretary of State for Public Services

Parliamentary Unknown- 11 points
Media Unknown- 19 points
Policy Novice- 21 points


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William Croft
(@william-croft)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 90
08/03/2019 5:54 pm  

I am dismayed at the news that some within the Labour Party are considering backing away from the campaign to keep Scotland in the United Kingdom. Seemingly for political reasons alone, some Labour MPs are now discussing the prospect of joining the pro-independence camp in the hopes of mitigating losses in the next general election. The decision on which side to take in the referendum is not a political one; rather it is a fundamental expression of the sort of country you believe Britain is and should be. The Conservatives have made that decision long ago: we stand on the side of our Union, because we know our country is stronger united than we are apart. 

I know I speak for my entire party when I say we're not willing barter with the Union's future in order to pick up a few points in the next opinion poll. Fighting tooth and nail to keep Scotland in the United Kingdom is the right thing to do, no matter the political consequences for one's party. If the Labour Party truly feels the same way, Ari Suchet will immediately clarify her party's position and confirm they believe we're Better Together. 


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Macmillan
(@dylan-macmillan)
MP for North East Bedfordshire
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 256
08/03/2019 9:43 pm  

Arianne Suchett has proven today again why the hard left of the Labour Party cannot be allowed anywhere near Number 10 again. Unemployment is at it's lowest rate in years and falling, consumer confidence it at it's highest rate in years and climbing, the deficit is down a third since Labour boldly declared that there was no money left. Suchett and her hard left fanatics would hike taxes on the land you own, the company you work for, and just about anything else she can get her hands on. There's no plan here, just a return to the tax and spend, high borrowing, low responsibility short termism that got us into this mess in the first place. Labour may not have learned a thing but the British people remember.

Conservative MP for North East Bedfordshire
Leader of the Opposition

Prime Minister (2014)

Parliamentary Experience: Unknown (14)
Media Experience: Capable (45)
Policy Experience: Unknown (13)


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Nathan
(@nathan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 214
09/03/2019 12:04 am  

Week Four: Ukraine (or: just a petty fight in disguise as a serious foreign policy discussion), zero hours contracts & Scotland. 

Verdict: Conservative victory (somehow).

BOLD YOUR PRESS CYCLES JUST ONCE. EVERY TIME SOMEBODY BREAKS THIS RULE THEY WILL PUT UP WITH THIS HUGE FONT REMINDER. AND ALSO NEXT TIME I WILL MAKE SURE THE PRESS BLANK THEIR COMMENTS.

Ok, now that's out the way again. 

This is the second time the Conservatives have come out of a situation they should've lost winning because Labour's press game is lacking and the Conservatives' is pretty damn slick (it's a bit like 2014/2015 IRL all over again...), except this time not as bad. Actually, for the first half, Labour were winning (lets just ignore that weird Ukraine spat which made nobody look good) - they had solid criticisms and an instinctively popular policy on zero hours contracts and the Conservatives were tearing each other up over LGBT rights and other stuff. 

But then at the end... Labour, that is what you call character assassination. It was just the faintest trace of blood but the Conservatives went in. Learn from that. This time you improved by having (some) media presence. Now think about how you can make it good - by coordinating messaging, and giving the Tories as much as a hard time as they gave you this press cycle.

Where my Lib Dems at?

+1 policy xp for James Wilson

+1 media xp for Dylan Macmillan

+1 media xp for Nathan Wilder

 


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Macmillan
(@dylan-macmillan)
MP for North East Bedfordshire
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 256
12/03/2019 7:29 pm  

I am thankful to the Liberal Democrats for approaching the talks in good faith but at the end of the day the parties were just too far apart. The Liberal Democrats wanted to play games with the constitution of the United Kingdom by deliberately and repeatedly suspending Cabinet collective responsibility, the mechanism through which our Government is kept on the same page and kept accountable to the House. This proposal, as well as a great many others, was unacceptable to me and to my negotiating team therefore the talks were aborted and an election motion laid before the House.

Conservative MP for North East Bedfordshire
Leader of the Opposition

Prime Minister (2014)

Parliamentary Experience: Unknown (14)
Media Experience: Capable (45)
Policy Experience: Unknown (13)


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General Goose
(@general-goose)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 87
12/03/2019 8:40 pm  

Here's what happened: Dylan Macmillan invited us to talks. Such talks were put on hold temporarily to allow a focus on the floods, but upon resuming, Macmillan refused to take them seriously. As we made clear both publicly and privately, we will not accept business as usual from any coalition - there must be a comprehensive concern for the rights and opportunities for everyone at the heart of government that dislodges all dogma and stubbornness, a renewed focus on the structural challenges facing our country, and an effort by the Conservatives to rebuild the trust that members of their party destroyed under Cambel and Saxon. We put forward proposals - proposals that would allow both parties to draw clear lines in the sand and make progress on building on the successes and rectifying the mistakes of past governments, and though the Conservatives promised us a counteroffer, instead we got Macmillan storming out. 

Graham Adiputera (Lib Dem - Sutton and Cheam)
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Climate Change
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Technology

Parliamentary - 20
Media - 36
Policy - 25


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Wilder
(@wilder)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 23
12/03/2019 8:41 pm  

The time of the Coalition was a fruitful period for our nation's political system, and our country as a whole. The Coalition was productive, and we had a number of key accomplishments that history will look kindly upon. We cut taxes for those who are struggling most within British society. We cut the deficit, so that our bills today aren't being paid by our children tomorrow. However, we have reached a point where, with the coalition increasingly strained, under its second renegotiation in a year. We have reached the point where we must take our case directly to the people. 

We look forward to running on an ambitious agenda, and earning the support of the British people to return as the largest party in Westminster. Eliminating the budget deficit, eliminating tax obligations for people on minimum wage, and making sure that the NHS works for the people. The Prime Minister is looking for a direct mandate, and if given, will enact a vision for a bright future for the people of Great Britain. 

Nathan Wilder
Conservative Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North
Secretary of State for Public Services

Parliamentary Unknown- 11 points
Media Unknown- 19 points
Policy Novice- 21 points


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General Goose
(@general-goose)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 87
12/03/2019 8:44 pm  

I have long supported civil partnerships for opposite-sex couples, and would support a law to put this into practice. I don't think it is the government's right to dictate how people celebrate their love or what labels are applied to it. But I oppose the motion by Charles Kinbote today. Why? Because, to Kinbote, this is not about extending rights. It is about denigrating and condemning the accomplishment of equal marriage, portraying it as a violation of the rights of heterosexual couples that must be retaliated against. This attitude is reflected in the language of the motion.

Graham Adiputera (Lib Dem - Sutton and Cheam)
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Climate Change
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Technology

Parliamentary - 20
Media - 36
Policy - 25


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Macmillan
(@dylan-macmillan)
MP for North East Bedfordshire
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 256
13/03/2019 10:08 am  

All I saw from the Leader of the Opposition's speech was a long wish list of policies with no way to pay for them. If you want to reverse nearly £60bn in Coalition efficiency improvements and deficit reduction you need to be honest with the people and tell them how you are going to pay for it. It's clear that Labour haven't learned a thing from their 4 years in opposition.

Conservative MP for North East Bedfordshire
Leader of the Opposition

Prime Minister (2014)

Parliamentary Experience: Unknown (14)
Media Experience: Capable (45)
Policy Experience: Unknown (13)


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Nathan
(@nathan)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 214
15/03/2019 7:42 pm  

Week Five: Coalition Collapses 2.0 + the gays 2.0

Verdict: Lib Dems win, I suppose, but the press were very bored this week.

Basic explanation: Labour this was awful for you. You get attacked and never ever respond. Why!? Lib Dems were very good. Tories had an ok media campaign too.


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Kandler
(@juliet-manning)
Member A-team
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 55
21/03/2019 8:24 am  

I want to thank the voters of Luton South who re-elected me as their Labour & Cooperative representative with an increased number of votes. I would also like to thank voters across the entire United Kingdom, who have voted Labour in numbers that we have not seen for nearly ten years.

The results of this general election paint a clear picture. The parties of the coalition government have lost votes and seats across the board: a clear message from the electorate that the ideologically-driven austerity politics of the recent past must come to an end. There appears to be a consensus now around some of the points that the Labour Party has raised over the past four years: that the public sector pay cap must end; that investment in public services must increase; and that deficit reduction should be a practical, not a political consideration.

However, it is clear that no one party has won an overall majority in the House of Commons. For the second time this century, the public have told us that no one party has secured their backing to govern alone, without seeking to identify new ways of cooperating across the political divide.

Smaller parties, such as UKIP, the Greens and the Scottish National Party, won more votes than they have ever won before. And despite earlier predictions of utter destruction, the Liberal Democrats held steady in many of their seats, where their representatives - broadly - have a solid reputation as effective and honourable constituency MPs.

What this makes very clear is that, as was foreshadowed in 2010, the era of two-party politics is truly at an end. Now more than at any time in British history, political leaders must be prepared to embrace a more conciliatory, cooperative, European style of politics which incorporates a range of views and a range of talents.

I also believe that this election result renews the case for electoral reform. As much as I disagree with the values and aims of UKIP, it is an irregularity that a party which wins more than 10% of the popular vote can end up in a position where it wins only a small handful of seats in the House of Commons. I hope that this election will be the last to be fought under First Past The Post; and I also hope that this Parliament will be the last in which there is a place for the unelected House of Lords.

Under constitutional convention, it is the incumbent Prime Minister who has the first right to seek to assemble a credible majority in the House of Commons, thus renewing his administration. And I am clear that Dylan Macmillan has a responsibility to stay in his position until a credible majority can be formed, whether that be a government led by him or by Ari Suchet. I think it would be decent and helpful to the public discourse if those on all sides of the debate, and amongst the media, paid due respect to that constitutional precedent and to the role of the Prime Minister moving forwards.

That said, I believe that talks between parties on securing a way forwards should not be exclusionary of the Labour Party, which does possess the largest number of seats in the new House of Commons and which is, therefore, the party with the strongest mandate to lead a new government. I therefore hope that the Cabinet Secretary will, with the full support of the Prime Minister, move to facilitate concurrent talks between all parties - and that all parties will be open to the possibility of working with one another.

I hope that, on this occasion as was not the case in 2010, all meetings between parties will be held on an open and transparent basis, and that official minutes will be taken by civil servants with a view to their publication at the appropriate juncture. The public should have the right to know what has been agreed in their name; and how that agreement - or those agreements - have been reached.

I have one further thing to say, if you will indulge me for a moment. Weeks ago, I wrote to constituency Labour parties across the country setting out my electoral ambitions for the party in terms of my role as the chairperson of the Labour Party, and the de facto head of the election campaign team. I made it clear that I viewed certain targets for 2014 as essential: a majority win in the general election, a strong performance in terms of the projected national share in the upcoming local elections, a finish ahead of the Tories in the European elections, and a vote for Scotland to remain a part of the United Kingdom in September.

I must acknowledge that for the Labour Party to have fallen short of an overall majority in this election is a reflection upon the campaign that I ran, and of particular concern must be our net loss of seats in Scotland even as we gained seats across the rest of the UK. I am not confident that I am the right person to address that particular challenge, given the view in some quarters that our campaign did not do enough to address the concerns of some of our most historically faithful supporters.

I therefore intend to resign as Chairperson of the Labour Party in order that a replacement can identify and establish a new campaigning strategy as we move forwards into the next set of elections.

Whether our role in the weeks, months and years ahead is to provide a strong government or a strong opposition, we will meet the challenge with fire in our lungs. There is no clear winner as yet: but in the end, the victors must be the British people, who truly deserve so much better than what they have had in recent years.

Thank you.

 

Rt Hon. Juliet Manning MP, MSc (UCL)
MP for Luton South
Secretary of State for the Home Department
Minister for Defence
Lord High Chancellor


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Wilder
(@wilder)
Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 23
21/03/2019 2:22 pm  

*Secretary of State for Public Services Nathan Wilder at an election night party in his constituency of Portsmouth North*

“The first thing that I want to focus on, is this seat. We were able to, on the most marginal of seats, maintain the strength of our majority here in Portsmouth North. Winning a majority of over 7,000 is a testament to this campaign, in this constituency. To the volunteers, who were knocking on doors, to those who were passing out flyers, the cogs that make any political campaign run,  you are the people that won this election for us. I am fully honored  to have been bestowed the honor of represented the northern half of this city, once again, in Westminster. I promise to continue working for all the people in constituency, and to be an effective MP for all of you in this hung Parliament.

WE do, indeed, live in a changing political era. For the 2nd election in a row, and yet only the 3rd time in the postwar system, have the British people delivered us a hung Parliament.  Moving away from the general tide of single party, majority governments, to an era of coalition governments. The British people demanding moderation, asking MPs to rise to the challenge of bipartisanship. We must reflect on what that means, both for the party and, most importantly, what that means for the country.

That means, of course, we find ourselves in a hung Parliament. Labour has won the election by the slimmest of margins, 0.3% of the popular vote, and just 19 seats. There is no running away from that- we have lost the election. However, we must look at how far we’ve come. In the winding days of the Cambel era, we were down nearly 10 points in the polls, and Labour were supposed to be riding high to their new found majority. The fact that the gap was narrowed so much, was thanks to the leadership of Dylan MacMillan. The Prime Minister rose to the challenge, and against all odds, delivered a much better than expected Conservative electoral performance.

He has faced his challenges, not the least of all coming from within the party. But he was able to unite and focus the party, and focus us on the task at hand. I want to personally commend him for that effort. if it wasn’t for MacMillan, it could have been a real bloodbath for the party, and a true majority government for the hard left with Ari Suchet at its helm, which would have been a calamity for the country. Instead of the knives coming out, we should rally behind the Prime Minister as the leader of our party, and I firmly believe that he will be able to lead us to a majority the next time we must take our case to the British people.

Now, of course, it is difficult to speculate what will happen next. But the math works one  way, and it is likely that a Labour/Liberal coalition will form- that’s how the Parliamentary numbers work. If that happens, as expected, we must make use of this time in opposition.  Let’s use this opportunity to energize ourselves as a party, to improve our brand, and to get more in touch with the people of the United Kingdom. It will be that hard work that give us the ability to rise in the polls, once again, and regain the trust of the British people over the lifetime of this next Parliament.

Nathan Wilder
Conservative Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North
Secretary of State for Public Services

Parliamentary Unknown- 11 points
Media Unknown- 19 points
Policy Novice- 21 points


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Macmillan
(@dylan-macmillan)
MP for North East Bedfordshire
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 256
23/03/2019 7:19 pm  

The Labour Party have been the largest party for all of five minutes and already there are members of, presumably, the Shadow Cabinet briefing against each other and against their leader. If Ariadne Suchet cannot command the confidence of her own party or her Shadow Chancellor how can she hope to command the confidence of the House or this country?

Conservative MP for North East Bedfordshire
Leader of the Opposition

Prime Minister (2014)

Parliamentary Experience: Unknown (14)
Media Experience: Capable (45)
Policy Experience: Unknown (13)


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Kandler
(@juliet-manning)
Member A-team
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 55
24/03/2019 11:25 pm  

https://docs.google.com/document/d/15wy-6zgBehG1XJYiua-sjxuICd693F0JSdt_njqRylA

Rt Hon. Juliet Manning MP, MSc (UCL)
MP for Luton South
Secretary of State for the Home Department
Minister for Defence
Lord High Chancellor


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