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Press Cycle #3 - Britain’s Relationship with the EU
#1
Media Cycle:

“Traditionally, each of Britain’s European Commissioners comes from Britain’s two major parties. With ex Liberal Democrat leader Charles Kennedy becoming a Commissioner does this symbolise a change in tone with Britain’s relationship with the EU?”

This press cycle will be closed at 23:59 on the 27/01/18. 

Remember to bolden the “tagline” of your statement. 
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#2
Our relationship with the EU has never looked brighter, we have broken the stale duopoly of appointing commissioners from the two main parties and the continent stands ready to undertake mutually beneficial arrangements for greater harmony economically and socially. There are many questions coming up for the people of Europe, the mooted Constitution, the potential expansion of the European Union and the Euro all being examples of this. It is down to the British Government to explore all of these proposals and get the best deal for Britain with easier and more open access to the market places of Europe. I'm sure the Liberal Democrats will vigorously support the new Prime Minister should he or she endeavour to further integrate the United Kingdom with the European Union.
REBECCA FLAIR

LIB DEM MP FOR MONTGOMERYSHIRE
______
'Emergencies' have always been the pretext on which the safeguards of individual liberty have been eroded. - Friedrich Hayek
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. - Milton Friedman
Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Milton Friedman
______

Mac the Great and Powerful
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#3
Well, good luck to him! But hold your horses: the future of our relationship is ultimately not decided in Brussels but right here at Westminster. I'm sure he'll do an excellent job alongside Neil Kinnock, but it's up to us here to set the direction. But you're right, we have to talk about it and have a good debate on what Europe can and can't do to take Britain further. Right now, apart from stock examples of awful policy like the Common Agricultural Policy, it's on balance doing quite well by us. The question is how can we keep improving it? I'd like to see less restrictions in Europe for our businesses - that means less borders, but also less regulation.
the Rt Hon. Angus "Gus" Quigley MP | Conservative MP for Crosby (1992-present)
Opposition Chief Whip (2000-) and Shadow Infrastructure and Transport Secretary (2000-)
Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1999-2000)

"Get Netflix at the PM's Office."
- Sybrand Buma, when asked what his first act as Prime Minister of the Netherlands would be.
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#4
I am certain that Charles will make an excellent EU Commissioner for he has been diligent, forthright and dedicated to his constituents over the years and I am certain he will bring the same level of commitment to his new roles as a Commissioner. I wish him the very best of luck in his new role. When it comes to the European Union it has been a project that has sought to bring a continent that has been plagued by war together to pursue peace and I believe it has achieved its initial aims, but as we come to consider closer integration it is essential that the British Government in Westminster ensure that the deal reached in Brussels is one that is beneficial to the United Kingdom and to the European Union. There will be areas where greater co-operation can be fostered and encouraged but we must not allow decisions to be rushed that will cause future problems for the UK and the EU in the future.
Rt Hon Oscar Hattingly QC MP
Member for Truro
Leader of the Liberal Democrats
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#5
The role of an EU Commissioner, first and foremost, is to be the voice of Britain inside the EU. They ought to have the strength of character to promote our national interests and put British values at centre of Europe. Charles Kennedy is an unusual pick because he hasn't spoken much about putting British interests at the heart of European governance or holding the EU to account. I will reserve judgement until I see more from him, but I remain an honest skeptic of this choice.
Aaron | Coaching Admin
Civil Service roles: FCO, MoD, Environment
Press roles: Foreign coverage
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#6
I honestly wish Mr. Kennedy the best of luck. I am sure he will apply all diligence towards his new job as he did in his previous position.

But, ladies and gentlemen, I have a problem. You see, I took a look at the votes for the last European Parliament, and who had the largest share of votes? The Conservatives. Who has the plurality of seats in our delegation to the European Parliament? The Conservatives. And who has the Labour Government shut out from the European Commission? The Conservatives.

By replacing the late Mr. Patten with Mr. Kennedy, a Liberal Democrat, the Government has shut out the choice of a third of the electorate from any participation in the European Commission. If this sort of thing were permitted for Westminster, I am sure the Labour Party would be up in arms! The Labour Government has done the impossible - it has seen how out of touch the EU can be with the concerns of the British public, and has somehow worked to make it even more out of touch! Developments like these, independent of Mr. Kennedy's honourable character, are even more reason to make sure that British policy is decided in Westminster, not Brussels.
Francis Paris PhD (Londin) MP
Member for Arundel and South Downs
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and the Environment
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#7
I don't think anyone except for the most extreme anti-Europeans would argue that Charles would not be a brilliant EU Commissioner. From his record in parliament he has shown himself to be an effective, dedicated and determined representative for the people of Ross-shire these past seventeen years. For the merchants of gloom and doom who would have said no matter who the government nominated for the role, that they would simply be a yesman who would do the bidding of Brussels - the naysayers have been proven wrong with Charles Kennedy's undertaking of the role. Simply sending a yesman or a naysayer to Brussels would be counterproductive for the United Kingdom and her position in the European Union. We need people in Brussels who will argue passionately for Britain and her interest, while also reaffirming our commitment to the European project and ensuring that we get the most effective and reformed Europe possible. There are definitely areas where we can reform European institutions, but there are also many more areas where we can continue to co-operate and form further bonds with our European friends and allies over the duration of Charles' tenure as an EU Commissioner.
James Keating | Labour
Member of Parliament for Bootle (1974-present)
Shadow Secretary of State for Health
Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Real Ale
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#8
I am honestly bewildered by some recent comments from the Government on this issue. I will state this again – I am certain Charles Kennedy is an honourable man who will do his best to stand up for British interests. As to him personally I only wish him the best of luck.

Unfortunately, I have less reason to be sanguine about this Labour Government, as I have previously said. The simple fact is, that in a parliamentary democracy, the party that wins the previous election at least should have influence over the composition of the executive. What Labour have done is completely shut out the winner of the last European Parliament elections from any participation in the European Commission. If elections have consequences, why do Labour act as if 1999 didn’t happen?
Francis Paris PhD (Londin) MP
Member for Arundel and South Downs
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and the Environment
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#9
The British people elected Labour on a clear platform to take a different line on Europe - away from the division and the antagonism of Major's Government, and instead a united and pragmatic pro-Britain, pro-Europe stance. Appointing Charles is a clear step towards that. He is well respected among our European neighbours, he is an accomplished statesman, and he is a man who will fiercely stand up for Britain and work closely with our European partners. Charles's appointment shows how Britain can lead in Europe under a united Labour Government rather than flounder and dither as it did under a divided Tory one.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#10
The issue of the European Union has always been, and will continue to be a precarious issue for the United Kingdom. There can be no surrender of further powers which belong to the British Parliament and the British people. The elected Governments of Britain must send a message to the unelected cohort in Brussels. A wasteful bureaucratic folly in Brussels must not be fed more powers from Britain or any member state. Charles Kennedy must now echo that sentiment in the corridors of Brussels.
Harold Jones MP
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer 
MP for Solihull
Conservative
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#11
I certainly feel positive about Charles' appointment, and I wish him the very best of luck in his duty. Now I've noticed that the Tories are sounding a different tone, and frankly it does not surprise me considering they've never been invested in promoting Britain's relationship with the EU. They'd much rather take orders from Rupert Murdoch than have an credible policy on Europe. Labour, on the other hand, has the will to stand up and take the reins on this very important issue, and I trust that our leadership will do so in the interest of Britain.
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#12
I would like to congratuate Mr Kennedy on his new position. However I cannot understand how Brussels disrupt London's sovereignty. We have our own government and parliament. Brussels cannot direct us to what we should do. I believe Mr Kennedy's task to ensure Britain's interest at the EU
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#13
Charles Kennedy as EU Commissioner I did not expect to see, I wish him luck in his new role, however I am concerned now we will see Britain's interests weakened within the EU. This cannot happen. Whilst we are a member from the EU, this country should benefit and this country's interests should be protected, I just hope that Mr Kennedy remembers Britain's interests when he is in Brussels.

(01-26-2018, 02:41 PM)Sir Harold Saxon Wrote: Charles Kennedy as EU Commissioner I did not expect to see, I wish him luck in his new role, however I am concerned now we will see Britain's interests weakened within the EU. This cannot happen. Whilst we are a member from the EU, this country should benefit and this country's interests should be protected, I just hope that Mr Kennedy remembers Britain's interests when he is in Brussels.

Typo, line should read "Whilst we are a member of the EU"
James Allen

MP for Leeds Central

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#14
I personally respect Charles Kennedy as an accomplished parliamentarian, but the issue is here not the man himself but what his appointment symbolizes. In choosing a staunch supporter of integration into Europe and the Euro as EU Commissioner the Government showcases once again their enthusiastic willingness to surrender more and more sovereignty to Brussels and to the unelected bureaucrats. Day after day they move closer to embrace the Euro and betray the Pound, and the Eurosceptic case continues to be dismissed on the Labour benches with outmost arrogance.
Rt. Hon. Edward Winter MP / Conservative and Unionist Party
Member of Parliament for Ashford (1979 - Present)

Shadow Foreign Secretary (1992 - Present)
Leader of the House of Commons (1990-1992)
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#15
Having grown up during the war, having seen the devastating conflict in Europe can bring, and having seen a united, peaceful Europe emerge from the ashes of destruction and death to me there is no question about Britain's relationship with European Union. We have fought together, bleed together, made peace together and for us to continue to prosper together we, in the UK, should reaffirm and strengthen our ties with Europe. The appointment of Mr Kennedy to EU Commissioner not only shows this ethos to the world but also the role of Britain in the EU is bigger than party politics. For this I applaud his appointment and wish him all the best in his role.
MP for Cambridge (1992 - )
Independent 
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#16
The Main signal that Mr. Kennedy’s appointment shows is that the Labour party is scared for the next election, they want all the credit but none of the blame on this key issue. They don’t want to have to make a uniform policy for their party and just go with whatever turns out to be better come election time. If Mr. Kennedy fails in Europe, they can blame the Lib Dems and if he succeeds they can glorify their wisdom and foresight. I call on the British People to see past this Political game and see how spineless the Labour party actually is.
MP for Aberavon
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#17
Press Cycle closed.
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#18
Marks/Summary:

Labour: 18 
 
Europe is a sensitive issue – after the NHS the euro is the issue most on British voters’ minds, and the pressure for Labour to pick a side of ramping up.
 
But Labour did well to spin this: Charles Kennedy is respected, and he indeed looks like a fair pick as Commissioner for the average British voter, even if he may be a touch too Europhile. Labour’s overarching message of strong relations with Europe – but to be a little careful with the federalism stuff – is one that the public can be comfortable with. But the question remains: for how long?
 
Conservatives: 20
 
Considering the other two media cycles set out traps for the Conservatives, this one offered a cornucopia for opportunity – and I think the Tories seized it relatively well. While euroscepticism is not alive in the way and form we know it today, the British public definitely aren’t federalist at current, and the Tories exploit that. The wets of the party toe a moderate tone that garners public appeal, but the contributions from eurosceptics like Paris and Summer are approved of too – most importantly, the statements from the europhiles and eurosceptics don’t seem to contradict each other too much.
 
Liberal Democrats: 12
 
A Lib Dem likes Europe? Well, I’ll be damned. You make your point passionately, but you’re telling the public what they already know. If you want to seize the momentum r.e Europe you’re going to have to give your arguments a bit more oomph and detail as to why closer relations with Europe is a good thing for your average Joe. Trying to nudge the government to pick a side is wise, though - it damages them and works well for you.
 
Influence Point awarded to:
 
Gus Quigley: “I’d like to see less restrictions in Europe for our businesses – that means less borders, but also less regulation.” – It’s sentiment that may have the Express panicking, but you summarise a fair, moderate assessment on the EU that centrists and liberals (of the classical and social variety) can appreciate. It’s not a completely tribal tone, either: “Europe is mostly good, but it needs to change and we need to take control” is definitely a position many in the Tory Parliamentary Party can accept, at least if they plug their fingers in their ears during the less borders part.
 
Francis Paris: “The Labour government has done the impossible – it has seen how out of touch the EU can be with the concerns of the British public, and has somehow worked to make it more out of touch!” – Well, you hit every nail on the head on why this news might raise some eyebrows: a lot of people feel this appointment doesn’t represent them and the breaking of tradition, the decision to neglect the Tory party, looks a little sleazy and opportunistic. Bringing up the 99 European results to emphasise your point was also a wise move. Paris could soon replace the likes of Redwood as the press’ favourite tell-it-how-it-is Eurosceptic firebrand, but he doesn’t stray too much from the wet side of the party’s sentiment to make the Tories look too divided.
 
Sean Manning: “Charles’ appointment shows how Britain can lead in Europe under a united Labour government rather than flounder and dither as it did under a divided Tory one.” – I’m glad somebody in Labour remembered that even if the Tories’ instinctive position on Europe is more palatable than Labour’s, Labour actually currently has favour on the issue because they didn’t fight over it to the extent they drove their government into the ground. Judging by the Tories’ response, the division claim may soon wear off – but as of now, it holds a lot of weight, and you effectively jabbed the Tories where they were sorest. If this message was repeated more by other Labour MPs, you could've won the press cycle.
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