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Press Cycle #9 - The Budget
#1
"Do you think the budget will be a good thing for Britain?"

This press cycle will be closed at 23:59 on the 23/02/18.

Remember to bolden the "tagline" of your statement. 
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#2
This Budget is a real vote of confidence in Britain as a leader in World Politics. Foreign Aid is up in real terms helping people the World over survive and thrive in harsh and inhospitable situations, our military gets a real terms pay rise and the money to equip themselves with the very best equipment available. This Budget is a true statement of intent from a Government determined to see Britain at the top table of global politics for the foreseeable future.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
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#3
Today's budget is one of the most uninspiring, unimaginative and uninteresting ever presented to this house in a time when the Government should be acting boldly in response to the many crises they have allowed to manifest on their watch. Their tax increases on oil industry profits will render their fuel duty cut pointless, their refusal to invest in British business has ensured a drop in GDP growth this year by 17% on last year's rate and their failure to address the housing crisis earlier paints their record perfectly; disorganized, ineffective and hopeless in power.
Dr. Evelyn Lynwood
Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (Oct 2002-????)
Conservative Member for Altrincham and Sale West
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport & Infrastructure (2002-2002)
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#4
A family with two children will be nearly £500 better off this year thanks to the tax and benefit changes made in the Budget, even before accounting for additional free childcare. The Budget is a real Budget for families - putting money where our mouth is and really supporting the ordinary and low income families that need it most. On top of that, parents will be entitled to a £1,000 child credit that will provide additional support to the lowest income families. The Budget takes huge steps towards our aim to end child poverty - a commitment that the Tories haven't even bothered to comment on - and supports the living standards of ordinary families with children.

The NHS will receive one of its biggest increases in spending ever as a result of the Budget, after the Tories cut the NHS budget in their last year of government. The NHS budget will rise by 11%, the second biggest increase in its budget since it was established. This funding will mean 10,000 more nurses, over £1 billion to cut waiting times, and £1.6 billion invested in NHS buildings and NHS technology and equipment. The final year of the last Tory government saw the NHS budget cut, record numbers on waiting lists, and record dissatisfaction with our health service, and Harold Saxon wants us to review why there aren't enough hospital beds. Labour is saving our NHS from Tory mismanagement and this Budget is yet another step towards a world class health service.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#5
The Budget will continue Labour's strong record in government on supporting business, jobs, and investment in the UK. Corporation tax on small businesses will be cut by 2 pence, and the low-income self-employed will get a £100 a year tax cut. A new R+D Fund will invest in the most innovative technologies alongside businesses. Regional transport will benefit from £8 billion of investment in the next ten years. Investment in adult skills with equip businesses with the skills they need to thrive in the future. That will help the UK economy continue to grow strongly - with the forecast projecting a fourth successive year of growth under this government higher than under the Conservatives. The Budget builds on four years of uninterrupted economic growth with a clear plan to support business, support jobs, and support investment in the UK - it is a budget for business and for workers alike.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#6
Whilst The Budget may have many areas of increased expenditure that many people will be grateful for, when it increases taxes on anybody earning over £29,000 it becomes a budget that is unfair. £29,000 is not a lot of money and to see working people targetted in this way is a disgrace.
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#7
The Tories believe that £29,000 a year per person is not a lot of money, they should try telling that to the bottom 80% of people in this country who earn less than that. The fact of the matter is that the average wage in this country is £16,000, significantly less than the £29,000 the Tories are desperately scrambling to protect. All the Tories can think to do in response to this Budget is show how desperately out of touch with the ordinary people of this country they are. Frankly they are so far removed from the realities of the troubles facing the people of this nation that it is laughable.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
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#8
Quite aside from their false claims that £29,000 is somewhere near the average salary, the Tories should take another look at the Budget. Everyone will benefit from an increase in the income tax allowance and a cut in fuel duty. And all families with children benefit from a record increase in child benefit and an additional 12.5 hours of nursery care a week for 3-4 year olds. Obviously, and rightly, we have focussed tax relief and new spending on those that need it most. But this is clearly a budget for everyone in Britain - rich, poor, just about managing - with investment in the public services we all use, investment in the economy that pays us all, and fairer taxes for everyone.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#9
The difference between the Conservative Party and the Labour Party is that the Labour Party see people as either being destitute and poverty stricken or rich and laden with money, whereas we see there is a middle ground between those who are genuinely disadvantaged, and are in need of financial support, and those who have aspired to better themselves, and earn more, and have done so, and can shoulder the burden of tax increases. That threshold is not £29,000. To those on low wages £29,000 is a lot of money - however it is not a massive amount in the grand scheme of things. £29,000 is not a threshold where we should start raising tax, if that is what we are to do. Labour's wish to reduce poverty is actually a desire to perpetuate it - whereas we want to see people who aspire to better themselves, and are sucessful in doing so, keeping more of their own wages, and those who genuinely need financial support getting the support they need, Labour wish to simply keep them poor, but out of poverty by offering many state handouts rather than offering an incentive to earn more.
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#10
The Tories, having been confronted with facts, seem to have decided to knuckle down rather than accept their mistake and move on. The budget will mean lower taxes for the vast majority of people. Altogether an average family will be £500 better off this year as a result of the budget. While the Tories call that a handout, I am proud to have delivered a budget that delivers an increase in living standards for ordinary families.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#11
I am proud to lead a Government which has provided a budget which provides a genuine helping hand to working families. With families £500 better off than previously, who can argue that we are building a better Britain for everyone. With a more than 10% rise in the budget for the National Health Service, we are continuing to fix the NHS which was left in a mess before 1997 - providing 10,000 more nurses, thousands of additional beds to provide everyone with the best healthcare in the world. This allows us to maintain a sustainable delivery of services within the NHS - building for our future. 

Whilst the Conservatives are silent on child poverty - something which should be absolutely unimaginable in the developed world - this Government has taken real action. An increase in child benefit and new child credit schemes, we are taking real action for a very real issue.
Hon. Charles Trenython MP | Conservative Party
Member of Parliament for Staffordshire South (1987-present)
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#12
This budget is a courageous step forward by this government and a clear declaration of the priorities that matter to us. It's about alleviating the pressures on people in their everyday lives: lessening the fuel duty, improving our NHS, increasing the child benefit, and making more credit available for building new homes in Britain. These are all good things for the British people, and these are things that have been explicitly delivered by a Labour government. But also telling is the reply we see from the Conservatives. It's no mystery on what a Tory budget offers: we already know it would mean more money in corporate oil's coffers. In terms of a government that delivers policy change for the public good, it's Labour.
Dame Beatrice Oona Millar DBE MP FRSE RSA | Labour
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1992- )
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Hillhead (1987- )
Member of Parliament for Edinburgh Leith (1957-1959)

Formerly: Parminder Chawla, Joshua Bertram, Lillian Nichols, Gareth Edwards, Andrew Pearson, L Chris Havilland, Mack Aldritt
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#13
I don't believe that we said that £29,000 was the average wage. We simply said that to increase tax on those earning £29,000 was unfair as it is a tax on aspiration.
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#14
I'm speaking in defence of smoker's - this budget is unfair to them. The Chancellor would have you believe that smoker's simply burden the NHS with costs but don't pay anything. Think about it - if they work, drink, smoke and drive - they already pay enough taxes into the system. Why should they pay more?
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#15
Offered a chance to change the course after their months-long silence on foreign affairs, the Government has chosen as a priority to give Foreign Aid a shocking increase of over 25% compared to last year and then triumphantly call it a vote of confidence. This despite the unmistakable fact that most of our international partners spend a lesser GDP percentage on this issue, and that increasing sums of delivered Foreign Aid are lost to corruption or irresponsible spending. This should be called out for what it is: a sign of waste and misguided priorities, and a sign of the Government’s lack of a proper long-term vision on foreign policy.
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Welcome as a pay increase to the Armed Forces is, this should be a time for bolder action in reversing the reductions to the Royal Navy and the Army caused by Labour’s defence policies, as well as looking more towards the future and potential challenges. And their chosen priority is to give International Aid alone a spending raise almost as big as they gave to the Armed Forces and the MoD combined. In another case of misguided priorities from the Labour Party, the Government all but proclaims that for them, International Aid and its associated waste is more important than spending in Defence and the Armed Forces. When it comes to the security of Britain, misguided priorities are what Labour has to offer.
Rt. Hon. Edward Winter MP / Conservative and Unionist Party
Member of Parliament for Ashford (1979 - Present)

Shadow Foreign Secretary (1992 - Present)
Leader of the House of Commons (1990-1992)
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#16
The Government's Budget supports a modern, compassionate, but robust foreign policy. Expanding foreign aid will - literally - save lives in developing countries and support Britain's interests abroad. The defence Budget will rise in real terms this year after the Tories cut it by a quarter in the 1990s, with funding devoted towards procuring equipment to best train our troops. Labour is investing in both our national defence, our national interest, and in cutting hunger and poverty abroad - a far cry from the last Tory Government that cut all three.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#17
We might just as well call Sean Manning "Conjurer of the Exchequer" for what he did about the fuel crisis. Yes, fuel duty cuts the price of petrol. But effectively, the Petroleum Revenue Tax works the same as VAT on the prices of fuel - you raise it, the companies paying it will likely charge the consumer. Labour botched their response to the fuel crisis initially, and they botched their opportunity to solve it with this Budget. Instead, they conjured up a situation that might fool the unwary, but which will definitely see the motorist pay for the cosmetic cut in fuel duty they're trying to sell you. I wouldn't fall for it.
the Rt Hon. Angus "Gus" Quigley MP | Conservative MP for Crosby (1992-present)
Opposition Chief Whip (2000-) and Shadow Infrastructure and Transport Secretary (2000-)
Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1999-2000)

"Get Netflix at the PM's Office."
- Sybrand Buma, when asked what his first act as Prime Minister of the Netherlands would be.
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#18
The Conservatives are now just plain lying in their desperate defence of big oil and their bumper profits. A senior shadow cabinet member just claimed that the petroleum revenue tax (PRT) - a tax on oil profits - is the same as VAT. This is simply not true. The PRT is a tax on oil profits from oil extraction in the North Sea, and has no relation to fuel prices. If the Conservatives oppose taxing bumper oil profits from high oil prices to give tax relief to ordinary working people, they should say so - rather than simply lying about it.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#19
Here we have the Chancellor of the Exchequer saying anything he possibly can to discredit the opposition. The Conservative Shadow Budget is clear , we've committed more yo the NHS than this Government and we have also gone further on disability benefits. Sean can whine all he wants, but this Conservative Party is delivering the real positive changes we need to build a better Britain.
James Allen

MP for Leeds Central

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#20
Sean Manning should know, with the qualifications he has for his job, how prices work. Petroleum Revenue is a tax on oil revenues - a tax on oil production. If you make it more expensive to produce oil, you make it more expensive to produce the fuel which oil is in. While I'm flattered to think myself a better economist than the Chancellor, this is something he simply has to know. At this rate, his excuses on fuel duty make him look like a Conjurer of the Exchequer - and not a particularly good one at that.
the Rt Hon. Angus "Gus" Quigley MP | Conservative MP for Crosby (1992-present)
Opposition Chief Whip (2000-) and Shadow Infrastructure and Transport Secretary (2000-)
Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1999-2000)

"Get Netflix at the PM's Office."
- Sybrand Buma, when asked what his first act as Prime Minister of the Netherlands would be.
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