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Press Cycle #10 – The Shadow Budget
#1
“Does the new shadow budget prove that the new Shadow Chancellor offers a credible economic alternative for Britain?”

This press cycle will be closed at 23:59 on the 26/02/18.

Remember to bolden the "tagline" of your statement. 
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
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#2
The Conservative Party has consistently been on the side of motorists and consumers throughout the fuel crisis. And we've proven it again with this Shadow Budget, which is the only one to effectively cut fuel duty instead of the trick the government is playing. They can talk all they want about stunts and hysteria on Sir Harold's part in this matter, but what I see is a man and a party that cares and, above all, that is honest. And that, in this day and age, is invaluable
the Rt Hon. Angus "Gus" Quigley MP | Conservative MP for Crosby (1992-present)
Opposition Chief Whip (2000-) and Shadow Infrastructure and Transport Secretary (2000-)
Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1999-2000)

"Get Netflix at the PM's Office."
- Sybrand Buma, when asked what his first act as Prime Minister of the Netherlands would be.
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#3
The Shadow Budget is a smoke and mirrors budget. They have promised more for public services - but seem to have forgotten that public services outside of England exist and have proposed to provide no extra funding for devolved governments. They have promised to cut fuel duty, but haven't funded it - instead wiping out the surplus in a single year and threatening to return us to the boom and bust of John Major. They have promised to "cut waste" from foreign aid, but haven't told us what that waste is - leaving us with the prospect that those cuts would fall on the poorest in the world. The Tories have learned nothing - their shadow budget would mean cuts in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, less support for the poorest people in the world, and its recklessness on the public finances would mean higher inflation and mortgage bills for ordinary people.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#4
Sean says we should put our money where our mouth is on the NHS. As Sean has shown before that he struggles with his sums and now he clearly doesn't understand English, let me make this clear for him. We doubled the Government's commitment on the NHS in our Shadow Budget. 
James Allen

MP for Leeds Central

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#5
The Chancellor seems keen to discuss the housing crisis he has allowed to develop on his watch. So instead of focusing on theoretical inflation in the housing market under a Tory Government that would at least cut housing costs by reducing stamp duty to help long time savers and young people to get their first homes - how about we focus on the fact that this year under Labour Housing prices have inflated by 8.5% above inflation. It's easy for the Chancellor to scaremonger about inflation in the housing market when his Government has delivered it themselves.

A Conservative Government will take any necessary step to protect Britain's housing market from abuse, but Labour wont give you the extra cash to get that first home you deserve.
Dr. Evelyn Lynwood
Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (Oct 2002-????)
Conservative Member for Altrincham and Sale West
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport & Infrastructure (2002-2002)
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#6
When I look at our Shadow Budget, I see a budget that is open for business by abolishing the start rate of corporation tax, and cuts to the corporation tax itself. I see disabled people getting more financial assistance and I see a very needed cut to fuel duty, whilst not hiking up the Petroleum Revenue Tax.

All of this is what the country needs, none of it offered by Labour.
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#7
This Shadow Budget represents a positive, responsible way forward in improving out national defence and showing how the Conservative Party is the party committed to a bolder, more effective agenda on defence policy. Not only it proposes to responsibly increase defence spending in most areas more than what Labour argued for, it increases the size of our Armed Forces to more effectively meet future challenges and committments. When it comes to the security of Britain, the Conservative Shadow Budget charts a responsible, strong and more effective course to follow.
Rt. Hon. Edward Winter MP / Conservative and Unionist Party
Member of Parliament for Ashford (1979 - Present)

Shadow Foreign Secretary (1992 - Present)
Leader of the House of Commons (1990-1992)
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#8
The Shadow Budget is deeply irresponsible. The surplus that Labour in government has delivered and used to pay down our debt would be wiped out in a single year. Such a reckless move will mean higher mortgage rates or higher inflation - proving that the Tories haven't changed from being the boom and bust party of 15% mortgage rates. It also means that they wouldn't be able to sustain tax cuts or increases in spending next year without raising taxes elsewhere or cutting spending elsewhere - the Tories want to break the bank on a single-year binge to buy peoples' votes. It just proves once again you can't trust the party that doubled the national debt, took interest rates to 15%, and crashed our currency out of the ERM to be responsible with the economy or with the public finances.

The Conservatives need to urgently make clear whether they are really proposing not to increase the Budget of the devolved governments at all in their Shadow Budget. If that is what they are proposing, it means that they are saying that public services in England should get more cash but public services in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland shouldn't. That just isn't good enough - and make a mockery of devolution. Labour on the other hand made £2 billion extra available, an increase in line with public spending in England. Public services need extra funding across the UK, and Tory plans to starve Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland of any more cash is at best incompetent and at worst cynical and penny pinching.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#9
The shadow budget offers the British people a sneak-peek at what could be if things were different, and it just goes to show just how much they fail to understand the people behind the numbers. While they're happy to slash and burn to bogeymen they don't like and add zeros to numbers just to score political points, they're failing to meet the human element of governance. A key example is their real-terms cut to rehabilitation services. If we are to have a truly functional justice system, it needs an element of rehabilitation services to help bring someone back on the mend. In the Tory budget, it's not a priority: in a Tory government, that life isn't worth saving. That's the message they're sending out with their proposal, and it's a clear reminder of why their policy program is a danger to British society.
Dame Beatrice Oona Millar DBE MP FRSE RSA | Labour
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1992- )
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Hillhead (1987- )
Member of Parliament for Edinburgh Leith (1957-1959)

Formerly: Parminder Chawla, Joshua Bertram, Lillian Nichols, Gareth Edwards, Andrew Pearson, L Chris Havilland, Mack Aldritt
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#10
The Shadow Budget would mean £1,000 less for the poorest children in the UK. The Child Credit, established in the Budget, is worth £500 on average to nearly 2 million children and £1,000 to the poorest. The Conservatives ignored the Child Poverty Act in Parliament and have made no public comment on the government's target to end child poverty by 2020. Britain's poor children - of which there are many thanks to the last Tory government - deserve better than Harold Saxon's ambivalence.

The Shadow Budget is soft on tax avoidance and on big oil. Rather than funding fuel duty and other tax cuts by cracking down on tax avoidance and taxing bumper oil profits this year, the Tories have funded it by depriving the devolved governments of funding and spending all the budget surplus in one year. Future taxpayers and people in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland are paying for a tory tax cut for big oil and tax avoiders - Harold Saxon needs to explain why that's fair.
Rt. Hon. Sean Manning MP

Chancellor of the Exchequer (2000 - )
Labour MP for Bristol East (1992 - )
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (1997 - 2000)
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#11
What the Conservatives have demonstrated in their shadow budget is that they are still incapable of being trusted within the public purse. A prime example is their unfunded cut in fuel duty. Harold Saxon and his frontbench bemoaned the Government during the fuel blockages, said they would cut 3p and then jumped to 6p just to get one up on the Chancellor, it is politicking at its worst and the Harold Saxon has decimated a budget surplus on the altar of his own political greed. he Conservatives have made a mockery of the budgetary process, showing their incompetence at every turn. It is clear that only Labour can be trusted to deliver a strong economy and you need only look at the process of the fuel duty cut, the Chancellor made sure it is fully funded and sustainable while the Conservatives have taken our economy to the edge just for a few extra polling points.
Rt Hon Oscar Hattingly QC MP
Member for Truro
Leader of the Liberal Democrats
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#12
If you listened to the Prime Minister at Prime Minister's Questions, he said that the Conservative Shadow Budget doesn't have a surplus and we didn't eliminate the prescription charge. If you look at our Shadow Budget, not only did we have more police, more NHS investment and greater tax cuts than the Government, we also have a surplus of just under a billion pounds. I left him a copy in case he wants to read it. Whether the Prime Minister is happy to lie to distract from the real alternative or he is just purely incompetent remains to be seen, but the Conservatives through our Shadow Budget offer a bold, true alternative, spending in the right areas for a better britain.
James Allen

MP for Leeds Central

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#13
Press Cycle closed.
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
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#14
Labour: 29
 
I winced reading this. Sean Manning really wasn’t kidding around, and went for the jugular. At first the attacks on the Tory Shadow budget seemed a little confused, rushed and squashed together but the Labour team united to really put the Tory shadow budget down, and it worked.
 
Conservatives: 21
 
Okay – don’t get disheartened. I wouldn’t say the British public are looking at your Shadow Budget and going for you with pitchforks, and some of your political marketing was really great. The British public look at the tax cuts, the spending, the military expansion and they do like what they see.
 
But Labour really hung onto some very specific faux pas and captivated on them, big time. Particularly on responsible spending and on funding to the regions, you were really, really stung and you never responded to those particular qualms, you’re going to need to engage with points being made instead of attacking Labour for doing x when they’re accusing you of y and hoping the distraction trick will work.
 
Influence Points Rewarded to:
 
Sean Manning: “Public services need extra funding across the UK, and the Tory plans to starve Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland of any more cash is at best incompetent and at worst cynical and penny pinching.” Yeah, owch. Not a good look. The Tories really need to woo places like Scotland and Wales, and to people in the UK who aren’t affected it looks kind of callous and looks like the Tories will only reward their own voters – which would be ok if the Tories have a voting coalition to form a majority (hint, as of now, they don’t).
 
Gus Quigley: “And we’re proving it again with this Shadow Budget, which is the only one to effectively cut fuel duty instead of the trick the government is playing.” Quigley may or may not be wrong, but his stuff on fuel duty and the government being ‘tricksters’ cuts across well. The bit not taglined, about Harold Saxon just caring so much and to stop bullying him for his hysteria was weirdly effective: Saxon’s image needs to be addressed, and I’m not sure if this way is the right way to do it, but it’s an okay start.
 
Elizabeth Tanner: “It is clear that only Labour can be trusted to deliver a strong economy and you need only look at the process of the fuel duty cut, the Chancellor made sure it is fully funded and sustainable while the Conservatives have taken our economy to the edge just for a few extra polling points.” Calling the Tories political opportunists works well, because Saxon can often outright appear that way with some of the things he did – but this ties into the economy and the deficit/surplus/spending really well. The former PM’s intervention is part of a wider narrative that makes people think: “sure, the Tories give a lot to public services and give out lots of tax cuts, but can we trust them to not return us to boom and bust days?”
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
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