Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Press Cycle #18 - The Euro
#1
"With the government announcing the five tests have been met, what next steps should be taken?"

This press cycle will be closed at 23:59 on the 23/03/18.

Remember to bolden the "tagline" of your statement. 
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
Reply
Thanks given by:
#2
With the fulfilment of the five tests and the conclusion that the Euro represents a fantastic deal for Britain we must determine the will of the British people and then fulfil it. I believe passionately that the Euro is the best choice of the United Kingdom, the analysis speaks for itself. In the Euro the UK would have lower unemployment, higher growth and greater investment than ever before. This Government will legislate for a referendum on the issue of the Euro before the end of this Parliament, the referendum itself shall be held after the next election no later than the end of 2003. This will ensure that the referendum is on the issues and the facts of the Euro, rather than a referendum on the popularity of this or the next Government.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
Reply
Thanks given by:
#3
Following the fulfillment of the five tests I am delighted to hear that the government is taking swift, decisive, and positive action toward joining the single currency. Our economy is now, more than ever, ready for the boost that the Euro and closer integration with our European neighbours will bring, and I will be campaigning tirelessly to ensure that the referendum takes place and that the outcome is a positive one. The British people must have a choice, and it must be based on the facts rather than the fiction that the Tories will peddle. It isn't about sovereignty, it isn't about Britishness, it's about our economy and the best deal for British workers, and in my view that deal involves the single currency.
Barbara Bond, Labour Party
Member of Parliament, Edinburgh South, 2015 - present
General Secretary, UNISON, 2005 - 2014

“Without a revolutionary theory there cannot be a revolutionary movement.” - Lenin
Reply
Thanks given by:
#4
I am pleased that the Government is keeping true to its manifesto promise to deliver a referendum on entry to the Euro. The five tests set out by the former Chancellor have been demonstrably met and now we will provide the British people the chance to say whether or not they wish to join the Euro. The analysis has shown that the Euro is a currency that is dynamic and has a vibrant future, and with membership Britain will see greater economic strength and prosperity, and will cement Britain's position as a leader of Europe rather than one looking in from the sidelines. I look forward to the referendum on this issue.
Rt Hon Oscar Hattingly QC MP
Member for Truro
Leader of the Liberal Democrats
Reply
Thanks given by:
#5
I’m glad the Government has finally realised what business groups and the OECD have been saying for some time: the Euro is good for the economy and the economy is good for the Euro. But this decision should have been made sometime ago, not in the final year of a five year Parliament. The Government has announced that we could still be waiting another two years for a referendum, four years after the introduction of the Euro, and then another seemingly interminable period for negotiations and further preparations on the entry. Meanwhile we will be losing our on stronger growth, higher employment and greater invest,net. The Government just needs to get on with the job, so we can all benefit from the Euro.
Reply
Thanks given by:
#6
Contrary to Conservative scare tactics that have tried to convince the British people that we shouldn't invest and adopt the euro, the five tests prove the euro would help to reduce the risk of poor investment performance by reducing instability, a a 25% rise in trade with the Eurozone, and an increase in the level of employment by between 350,000 - 400,000. It's far time we get on the road of economic success for our nation rather than  continue to listen the road of scare mongering that has plagued the Conservative party for decades.   
Nelson Mabuza
MP for Blackburn

Reply
Thanks given by:
#7
Frankly, I'm repulsed by the number of politicians willing to de-Britishify our currency by gambling on the word of "experts". These were the people who said entering the ERM would be smooth sailing, and look what happened. Why these pinheads in parliament expect anything different is beyond me....
Reply
Thanks given by:
#8
The Government has announced that the Five Tests have been met, but what it isn't telling people is what the single currency means for people. It will mean higher mortgage payments, more sovereignty lost to Brussels and "tighter fiscal" policy - meaning less spending on public services and higher taxes on working families. The Government has told us the single currency means more jobs - but unemployment in member states which have adopted the single currency stands at around 10%. There are clear economic dangers of the single currency - the Government needs to be straight with people.
Member of the Conservative and Unionist Party
Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (2001 - Present)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001 - Present)
Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness (1997 - Present)
Reply
Thanks given by:
#9
Having sat in the House and listened to the Shadow Chancellor's critique of the Five Tests report I am forced to conclude that she either doesn't know what she's talking about or is lying to the public. She claims the Euro will lead to higher unemployment, for the examples she herself brought up it hasn't. She claims that the Euro will be bad for investment, for the examples she brought up it hasn't been. I am all for healthy and robust debate on the future of our currency, but that debate must be based in reality and fact, not the kind of blind hyperbole and hysteria that has come to define the modern Conservative Party frontbench.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
Reply
Thanks given by:
#10
The economic arguments for the Euro are clear and convincing, yet we must not forget the very important political considerations as well. I believe Britain must be at the heart of a transparent, democratic and pluralistic Europe which necessarily means our adoption of the Euro. Our future is linked to the success of the European project and we owe it to ourselves and our children to champion a common currency that provides stability and encourages prosperity.
Omari Omondi MP
Member of Parliament for Tooting (1997-)
Labour Party




Reply
Thanks given by:
#11
I have to say that when it comes to this debate on the Euro, I did not expect the Government to stoop so low and do everything it possibly can to stifle debate. After being presented with a valid argument by the opposition, the Chancellor raised a point of order so he didn't have to respond to the argument, the point of order was unfounded. It is quite sad that the Chancellor has to resort to cheap tactics rather than showing true leadership, all he wants to do is run away from the argument when he should be engaging with the opposition on this important debate.
James Allen

MP for Leeds Central

Reply
Thanks given by:
#12
I agree with the Chancellor on very little, but I do agree with him on the Euro. The facts are clear. To claim that the Euro is the cause of unemployment in member states is dangerous scaremongering and scapegoating: I hope we will avoid that in the forthcoming referendum. Britain has the much needed flexibility in the labour market, thanks to Conservative Government reforms, to keep unemployment low as investment and growth increases when we join the Euro.
Conservative MP for Henley (1997 - )

Reply
Thanks given by:
#13
They can shine it up as much as they like about the Euro, saying it is good for business and it can only do good for the UK.

What they seem to be keeping from the people is that the single currency is the journey to political integration as you cannot have monetary union without political union.
Ross Bailey

Conservative Member for Ruislip - Northwood
Reply
Thanks given by:
#14
The Euro is the end of individual nations. The EU don't like the idea of nations having their own currency because they want to wipe out the idea of individuality and nationalism.
MP For Hexham 1987 -
Reply
Thanks given by:
#15
Once again Tory scaremongering strikes, they talk about political union, they talk about how the euro will fail Britain, they talk about how high unemployment. Even though the report as shown has proven otherwise, strong employment and a strong economy. The fact of the matter is that the  eurosceptics prove they'd rather have Britain left behind than advance into economic progress, its time to give their scaremongering a rest.
Nelson Mabuza
MP for Blackburn

Reply
Thanks given by:
#16
Today we have seen something quite remarkable happen at the heart of Government: The Chancellor told the House that he is does not have the authority to speak on behalf of the Government. Is there a division between the Chancellor and the Prime Minister on the Euro? The Chancellor wants people to support this Government's quest for greater political and monetary union with the European Union, but he does not even have the authority to speak on behalf of the Government. Just days after announcing the five tests had been met, the Chancellor's recent comments raise serious questions over the Government's position on the Euro: if the Chancellor cannot speak on behalf of the Government, why should people listen when he tells them the single currency is right for Britain?
Member of the Conservative and Unionist Party
Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (2001 - Present)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001 - Present)
Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness (1997 - Present)
Reply
Thanks given by:
#17
Press Cycle closed.
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
Reply
Thanks given by:
#18
Conservatives: 26
 
I’d say generally you guys came across as slightly better in this press cycle – you need to try and become a more unified voice on the euro (hah, dream on, maybe?) even if you disagree on your assessment of if the euro is good/bad. What helps is you didn’t seem as divided as Labour – or Labour didn’t spin your divisions the way you spun theirs. It was transparent, but ultimately effective and helped you win the press round.
 
Labour: 24

I think similar arguments can be made for you - you needed perhaps a slightly more united front with your backbenches made on side a bit more, perhaps all united under support for a referendum despite the variety of views for example. Even worse, you didn't spin the Tories' divisions as effectively as they did yours. Some really, really solid contributions here though, which means you didn't really suffer a defeat worth being upset about. 
 
  • Sidenote: party lines don’t represent the broader lines of who is winning the euro debate though – and I think the pro-euro group overall came across better in this press cycle, they were pretty cushioned by the five tests and weren’t afraid to flaunt them, and the anti euro bunch didn’t use the emotional arguments as potently as they usually do. But a warning: winning a battle doesn’t mean you’ve won the war. 
 
Influence Points Awarded to:
 
Barbara Bond: “It isn’t about sovereignty, it isn’t about Britishness, it’s about our economy and the best deal for British workers, and in my view that deal involves the British currency.” It’s all good to say things will be good for the economy, but people need to feel that be personalised and have the low down for how that will benefit them – of all the contributions, and the pro euro ones, Barbara Bond makes that case the best.
 
Elizabeth Atwood: “It means higher mortgage payments, more sovereignty lost to Brussels and a “tighter fiscal” policy – meaning less spending on public services and higher taxes on working families.” I mean, I’m not sure if this is true, but it resonates more than the higher unemployment thing – I’m also sure the Chancellor didn’t mean tighter fiscal in that policy but if that’s the case you played his words against him and twisted them into a thorn in his side – with the public services line, even his own traditional voters will be left worried. Some clever politicking. And a Tory rallying against austerity? The joys of opposition, huh?
 
Aubyn Myerscough: “To claim that the Euro is the cause of unemployment in member states is dangerous scaremongering and scapegoating: I hope we will avoid that in the forthcoming referendum.” Likely not good for your party, but good for your side of the euro coin (hardy har) – project fear is seldom a good stance to take, and either side of this debate will probably want to more effectively paint their side as that. Aubyn takes the first shot, and takes it well.
“Yes. It’s terribly simple. The good guys are always stalwart and true. The bad guys are easily distinguished by their pointy horns or black hats, and, uh, we always defeat them and save the day. No one ever dies and… everybody lives happily ever after.”
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)