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Press Cycle #31 - General Election
#1
"What does the General Election mean for each of the parties - and what's next?"

Ends 11:59 30/04/18

Bolden your tagline.
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#2
The general election results are the beginning of the end for Prime Minister Finch and his weak government. He has been shunned en masse by voters, and it's doubtful he can hold his party together long enough to get through a full-term of Parliament. In contrast, the only party to make gains was the Conservative Party under the strong leadership of Harold Saxon. I suspect when we do this all again in a few months, that Mr. Finch will need to find himself a good moving company.
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#3
The General Election showed that the Conservative vision for a Britain fair for all has resonated with voters. Labour, which led a campaign of fear, lost its majority. The Conservative party gained just shy of 50 seats - while Labour and the Liberal Democrats have been left weakened, with the Prime Minister himself almost losing his seat. The Conservative party will continue to build on this vision we have set for a Britain fair for all so that we set down a roadmap to government. 

Even Labour's own MPs acknowledge that the Conservatives have set the agenda on the economy, social care and action to tackle injustices in society. Labour is talking about getting back to basics, but we have seen what that means under this Labour leadership - higher taxes, attacks on business and a divided country. This will be made all the worse now this zombie government is forced to look for support from the Liberal Democrats.
Member of the Conservative and Unionist Party
Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (2001 - Present)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001 - Present)
Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness (1997 - Present)
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#4
This election was a rout for Labour and this Government, plain and simple. In a clear sign of their dissatisfaction with this Government, British slashed Calum Finch's majority to one seat. Although Conservatives did not manage to get back into Government, it's clear that our message of hope and renewal resonated with British voters, who sent us back to Westminster emboldened with 45 new MPs. 

The momentum is on our side, the people are on our side, and without a doubt, by the next election we'll be in Downing Street. Labour, meanwhile, have lost their mandate, lost their momentum, and what remains of this Government is running on fumes.
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#5
The British people have put the Government on noticed. They lost their overall majority and only thanks to Sinn Fein is Flighty Finch spared the indignity of graveling for a C&S agreement or a coalition. One vote, one by-election separates this government from being consigned to oblivion. The Party of Fear, the Party of Division, the Party of Punishing Success was held accountable by the British people. Today may be red, but tomorrow will be blue. Only the Conservatives gained seats. Only Conservatives laid out a positive vision for Great Britain. Conservatives are on the rise because of our due diligence in representing the issues most near and dear to the British people. 
Philip Porter
MP for Orkney and Shetlands (1983-Present)
Leader of the Liberal Democrats (1992-Present)
Liberal Democrats Spokesman for the Treasury (1992)



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#6
The election is over, the Tories lost, and we will govern on the manifesto we put to the British people. Thank you.
Dame Beatrice Oona Millar DBE MP FRSE RSA | Labour
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1992- )
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Hillhead (1987- )
Member of Parliament for Edinburgh Leith (1957-1959)

Formerly: Parminder Chawla, Joshua Bertram, Lillian Nichols, Gareth Edwards, Andrew Pearson, L Chris Havilland, Mack Aldritt
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#7
The election? 328 Labour victories and 1 Tory win. Her name is Elizabeth Artwood, the only man in charge of the Tory Party. It is usually the subordinate that gets humiliated over the act of firing, however Saxon showed us otherwise. A Labour government and a fatally woonded Conservative bunch, this is what the election meant.

Today is red, but not because we were endorsed once again to govern this United Kingdom, by and for its people. The red is the bloodbath of Tory infightings since before election night was over. I feel for Harold Saxon, he got stabbed to death twice: once by the sword of the country, and then the machette of his Shadow Chancellor too.
The Rt Hon Angela Harvey MP | Labour Party, Socialist Campaign Group

Deputy Prime Minister & Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (1992 - Incumbent)
Member of Parliament for Dover (1992 - Incumbent)

Previously: "A nobody backbencher", "Backbench Spokesperson for Everything"

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#8
Most votes and most seats, by a country mile, means Labour won the election clearly and the Tories lost badly. Pure and simple.
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#9
Labour lost 36 seats, and yet their delusions of grandeur continue. The only party to see any success in the election was the Conservative Party. The Prime Minister nearly lost his own seat, and is only in power thanks to the likes of Sinn Fein. As we know from their policy agenda, Labour is on another planet. Their reaction to the election results just proves that to be even more true than we originally thought.
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#10
It is remarkable that Labour are marching out to hail what a great victory the election was for them, but let us be clear about what happened. Labour lost 36 seats and lost its majority. It's national share of the vote was down by almost 4%. The Conservatives gained just shy of 50 seats, and our national share of the vote increased by 4%. This was not a victory, but a message to the Labour party that has betrayed voters on the agenda it set out in 1997 - voters from 97 turned to the Tories in this election because we set out a plan for the future - a Britain fair for all - and the voters know that this socialist, extremist Labour party can offer only division. That is why it was only the Conservatives that increased their share of the vote and the number of seat in Westminster.
Member of the Conservative and Unionist Party
Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (2001 - Present)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001 - Present)
Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness (1997 - Present)
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#11
When the result came in only one individual was spoken of as a Prime Minister, and only one man was looking over his shoulder at possible coups and deposition. If the Tories are the winners of this election then how come Saxon has had to fire his Shadow Chancellor and then been forced by backbenchers to rehire her? The clear winner of this election was Callum Finch, Labour are in Government and we shall remain so for the foreseeable future.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
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#12
I'm grateful that the British people made the right choice to give the government a second term, however I think that the results shows that we can't take non-swing voters for granted. The campaign might be over, but issues such as [b]losses in manufacturing, homelessness, and poverty are still very much being faced by the everyman, and we need to let them know that we not only hear them but are here to help.[/b] I think this election gives us the perfect opportunity to do so, and I look forward to taking part in that discussion.
Terry Roberts, MP for Southampton Test
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party
Shadow Foreign Minister


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#13
There is no complacency. Labour must continue to deliver for the British people. We won the war now we must win the peace and the work starts now. This is a mandate to deliver from this point forward, putting into the place the vision set out during the campaign. The election was not a referendum on the past, but even if it was we won anyway.
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#14
The result is clear: Labour is still the strongest party in the UK. We have received a majority of seats and we are making progress in areas such as Scotland.  This Labour government must now work in ensuring that we deliver our promise of making our country a land of opportunity and prosperity for all whilst keeping it safe and strong.
The Tories talk of strong leadership but members of the Shadow Cabinet wish that the Leader of the Opposition would just resign. While they quarrel between them, we will enact new policies such as building schools and hospitals, reforming the prison system or fighting terrorism. The choice is clear for the British people: support a strong government that will put them first or support a party that advocates for "stable and strong leadership" but can't even find a "stable and strong" leader.
William Marion MP | Labour
Member of Parlament for Bootle (1997-)
Ex-Chief Crown Prosecutor for CPS North East
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#15
I should like to thank my constituents in Tonbridge and Malling for their support in the most recent general election and recommit myself to their representation. I would also like to say that, while the result in the latest election was a little disappointing, the overall sense among my colleagues and myself is that we are returned with a greater share of the House and look forward to hearing the Queen's most gracious speech and holding the Government to account. The Labour mandate is significantly weakened and we look forward, therefore, to a more conciliatory and cooperative government this time around.
[Image: VO5PA6L.png]
R I C H A R D • D E • V I L L I E R S
C O N S E R V A T I V E
for
G R A N T H A M

Shadow SoS for Regions, Nations, & Devolution | Constitutional Affairs

CORNERSTONE GROUP
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#16
All politicians, quite unusually, seem to be celebrating the election result, and so was I until the wider picture analysis started to emerge. For the first time in my lifetime, and possibly for much longer, we hit a low of less than 65% voter turnout nationally, and in some places such as London as low as 60%. This means that our people are feeling disengaged, it means they see no point to exercise their hard-fought democratic rights. We as public servants, all 650 of us, need to abolish party lines on voter turnout issues and come together under the leadership of the Prime Minister to re-engage with the British people! Low voter turnout works to the benefit of no one, yet alone our bosses - the people.
The Rt Hon Angela Harvey MP | Labour Party, Socialist Campaign Group

Deputy Prime Minister & Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (1992 - Incumbent)
Member of Parliament for Dover (1992 - Incumbent)

Previously: "A nobody backbencher", "Backbench Spokesperson for Everything"

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#17
The simple answer is that it means that Labour has clearly won and has the right to govern on behalf of everyone in the country. Despite this, the result does mean that we have gone backwards despite all the positivity emerging, quite rightly from my colleagues on some counts. We should take this result as a challenge from the British people to deliver lasting positive change for every community, we should make sure that the gains for the British people we boasted about in the election are felt by all and I look forward to the good, hard work that we will be putting in.
Thomas Joseph Lowe | MP for Mansfield (1979-Present)

"We are not just here to manage capitalism but to change society and to define its finer values." - Tony Benn
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#18
It is clear that after this election Labour is a divided party: its MPs do not know whether to celebrate this weakened government holding on to office, or whether to be conciliatory and recognise this was not a victory, alluding to more needing to be done by the government. It will be important to see how this division manifests itself in the weeks to come - with Finch's premiership already in a rocky period, will Labour MPs keep him as their leader?
Member of the Conservative and Unionist Party
Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party (2001 - Present)
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001 - Present)
Member of Parliament for Beverley and Holderness (1997 - Present)
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#19
The result of this election has been clear - the British people are sick of the scandals, the laziness and the weakness of this Government and have returned the favour to Labour with a Hung Parliament. This leaves us with a fractured Government in which the radical Anti-NATO, pro-Nationalisation, pro-Terror far left can prosper and exploit their leadership's weakness.
Dr. Evelyn Lynwood
Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (Oct 2002-????)
Conservative Member for Altrincham and Sale West
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport & Infrastructure (2002-2002)
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#20
Leaves the Palace having sworn the oath for the first time as a new MP.

I have now officially begun my service as the MP for Glasgow Maryhill, and this is an absolutely tremednous honour. With disappointment I noticed, however, that my conservative colleagues are still obsessing themselves with how they, supposedly, won the election. Only the Tory party can lose two successive elections and remain in opposition, whilst acting like we lost and they were victorious.
The Rt Hon Angela Harvey MP | Labour Party, Socialist Campaign Group

Deputy Prime Minister & Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (1992 - Incumbent)
Member of Parliament for Dover (1992 - Incumbent)

Previously: "A nobody backbencher", "Backbench Spokesperson for Everything"

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