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Who's Who
#1
Detailed Biographies can go here.

For example:

Quote:Nick Ashton was born on the 8th January 1967. He has two kids, a wife called Slyvia and a dog called Milo. Nick's father was a fighter pilot and his mother was a chemist .......


You get the idea, it can be as long or as short as you like. Please remember this is 1994, so nothing too radical please.
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#2
Rt Hon. Sir James Anthony Peregrine Whitelaw Bt QC MP is a British Conservative Party politician and the Member of Parliament for Witney.

Born on 9 October 1945, James was the eldest son of a Baronet, Sir Lance Whitelaw, who had forged a career as a newspaper proprietor before serving in the second world war as a fighter pilot. James’ mother, Elizabeth, was very ill for much of his childhood and he was brought up by an employed nanny.

James attended Heatherdown School followed by Eton College, where he captained the school cricket team and became Head Boy. He went on to attend Brasenose College at the University of Oxford, where he studied History and Law and became President of the Oxford Union.

Whilst at Oxford, James met his future wife Ashley, who was a fellow student. The couple married in 1968 and bore three children - Andrew, Sebastian and Charles.

James trained at Gray’s Inn as a criminal barrister before being called to the bar. He inherited his father’s Baronetcy upon the death of Sir Lance Whitelaw in 1977.

A lifelong member of the Conservative Party, James was selected to contest the new seat of Witney for the 1983 general election. He handily won, and entered Parliament in that year, being appointed a Queen’s Counsel as was customary for MPs who are accomplished barristers.

James’ first significant post was as a member of the Treasury Select Committee, on which he sat from 1985 until 1987. In that year, he was appointed a junior minister at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, before going on to become Secretary of State for Trade & Industry under John Major. James resigned from the Cabinet in 1992 following Black Wednesday.

James is a member of the Church of England and a practising Anglo-Catholic.
Rt Hon. Sir James Whitelaw Bt QC MP
Member of Parliament for Witney 1983-Present

Secretary of State for Trade & Industry 1990-1992
Minister of State for Europe 1987-1990
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#3
Elizabeth Anne Cabot was born Elizabeth Anne Wellesley to Lord George Wellesley and Lady Louise Wellesley at Apsley House in central London on March 1, 1930. She grew up in relative privilege, as might be expected by a member of a noble family. She was educated at Roedean, before earning a degree in law from Somerville College, University of Oxford.

After graduating university, she joined Her Majesty’s Diplomatic Service, being posted in Belgrade, Canberra, Budapest, and Brussels (seconded to NATO HQ). However, in 1959 she departed the Diplomatic Service upon her marriage to Lord Geoffrey Percy, the youngest son of the 8th Duke of Northumberland. At the wedding, the couple was gifted a yacht christened The Prince of Waterloo after the title held by her grandfather. Rejected from all positions in the United Kingdom at which she sought work, the couple moved to Geneva, where Elizabeth gained employment at the United Nations in the Department of Political and Security Council Affairs. In 1964, tragedy struck when Lord Percy was found to have developed testicular cancer - he passed away in 1965. Following his death, Elizabeth went to work for the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation secretariat, where she met her second husband, an American sailor named William Cabot.

In the late 1960s, she transitioned back from NATO work to working for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, where she would rise to become the number two official in the office. Upon completing her work for with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, she was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (DCMG). Much later, following a quip on Yes, Minister regarding the meaning of CMG, KCMG, and GCMG, she noted to colleagues that DCMG might stand for “Do Call Me God”. After her work at the UN, she transitioned to working as a lawyer in London, specialising in international and European law. In 1976, she decided that she wanted to seek elective office and pursued, via family connections, the Conservative nomination in Petersfield, near her family’s seat in Hampshire. She was elected to Parliament in 1979.

After a quiet first two years in Parliament, she was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to Douglas Hurd, then the Minister of State for Europe at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. After the Conservative landslide at the 1983 election, she became an under-secretary of state at the Department of Health, before relocating to the Home Department following the appointment of Mr Hurd to be Home Secretary. She would round out her tenure in the Thatcher ministry as a minister at the Department of Health under Ken Clarke. In 1990, she voted for the Prime Minister in the leadership election and state she would support her in the second round, before she stepped aside. In the subsequent election, she initially backed Mr Hurd before switching her support to John Major to “keep Heseltine out at all costs”. She was made the Minister of State for Overseas Development under Mr Hurd at the Foreign Office, with an invitation to attend Cabinet and an appointment to the Privy Council. Following the Conservative victory at the 1992 election, she was reshuffled to be Minister of State for Europe.

In 1992, she faced an escalating moral crisis in the Foreign Office, with the refusal of the government to commit to the use of military force in Bosnia. Following Douglas Hurd’s comments on a “level killing field”, Dame Elizabeth accepted that she could likely no longer support the position of the government and sought counsel from Baroness Thatcher, an ardent proponent of intervention in Bosnia. Having received counsel, Dame Elizabeth wrote the Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs stating her intention to resign as Minister of State for Europe. Shortly after her resignation, she secured an appointment to the Foreign Affairs Select Committee and was elected its Chair, where she embarked upon scrutiny of the government’s actions in southeast Europe.
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#4
Hon William Henry Croft QC MP is British politician, member of the Conservative Party, and Member of Parliament for Chipping Barnet.

Born on November 13, 1953, William is the middle child of James and Margaret Croft. James is an economist, earning his PhD in economics from the London School of Economics. William grew up with his parents, brother and sister in the family's home in Exmoor. Earning a King's Scholarship to study at Eton College, William excelled in politics and philosophy. Upon graduating, he earned a place at Oxford studying politics, policy and law.

After graduating from Oxford in 1975, took a job as a foreign correspondent for the Telegraph in Washington, D.C., where he met his American wife Christina. The couple married at a ceremony in London in 1977, and have two children, Mark and Elizabeth.

While working in Washington, William was elevated to the position of U.S. editor for the Telegraph. Covering American politics, the Cold War, and US/UK relations William garnered a strong understanding of foreign affairs and a passion for geopolitics. William resigned from his position in protest over the Telegraph editorial board's initial lackluster support for Mrs. Thatcher's proposals to radically cut national spending.

William returned to The United Kingdom in 1979, leaving his post at the Telegraph to join the campaign staff for the Conservative Party's 1979 election campaign. William was then appointed to the leadership team of the Center for Policy Studies, a right-wing think tank that worked to support the Thatcher government by providing research-based policy proposals aimed at opening up markets, reducing regulation and privatizing state owned industries.

After earning praise for his work during the 1979 campaign and a reputation as hard-line supporter of the privatization, William was selected as the Conservative Party candidate to contest the Chipping Barnet seat in the 1983 General Election. Riding the wave of massive popular support for the Conservative Party, William was elected with a strong majority. He continues to represent the seat to this day.

In 1985 William was appointed to serve as a junior minister under the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and in 1987 was made Chief Secretary to the Treasury to lead the Government's efforts to reduce financial regulations and to continue to privatization of state industries. With the election of John Major as 1990, William was chosen to continue in that role.

In 1992, William announced he would be resigning from the front bench after the general election, citing differences in opinion between him and the Prime Minister on Britain's involvement within the European Economic Community. In 1994, William became the chair of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee. In the same year, he released a book about Britain's place in the world as the 21st century approached, entitled "The British Question: Why Britain Must Remain a Leading Power in the 21st Century."
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#5
George is a quirky individual whose unique set of life experiences has fashioned him into the unapologetically odd man he is today. Born the son of a coal miner in 1940, George spent his childhood in poverty surrounded by poverty in England. His Father died when he was 2, and his mother quickly remarried in order to support her family. While George attended public schools and had little access to quality tutoring, he demonstrated a great hunger for knowledge, particularly in the humanities, and spent most of his time after school at the library reading all that he could. His mother encouraged these tendencies, hoping that he could break the cycle of his family's poverty while his Father dismissed George's aspirations as fool-hearty.

After turning 18, his step-father died of black lung leaving his mother once again on her own. Recognizing the need to support his mother and brothers, George enlisted in the Royal Navy hoping to bring in some measure of stable income. Assigned to HMS Vanguard, George quickly found himself at home in the Royal Navy, sending back most of his money to his Mother. After several years on the Vanguard, George was re-assigned to the Aircraft Carrier HMS Eagle. George was delighted with this new assignment which carried with it a promotion to Petty Officer. Disaster struck only a year into his new assignment however when a training accident resulted in the loss of his right leg. As a result of the loss of his leg, George was discharged from the Royal Navy and returned home.

After battling with depression as a result of the loss of his leg, George returned to his old love--books. In reading, he found great comfort. His pension from the Royal Navy barely covered his own expenses however, and did little to help his family. After struggling to find a job, he finally caught a break when the owner of a local bike shop hired George to assist in cycle repairs. George developed a great passion for cycles, though the prosthetics at the time made it a challenge for him to ride them on his own. Nevertheless, he found great purpose in fixing and creating these contraptions.

After a few years at the bike shop, George saved up enough money to go to university. At University, George rekindled his passion for philosophy and gained a new appreciation for history. While still working at the cycling shop in the evenings and on weekends, George continued his education until he finally received his Doctorate in Philosophy. After technological advancements to prosthetics, George was finally able to ride cycles and used them as his primary mode of transportation. He quickly became disaffected however at the lack of cycle-friendly roads and began lobbying the Bishop Auckland Urban District council to make changes to create cycle lanes. His activism grew as he advocated for greater access for disabled persons. This advocacy caught the attention of the local Labour party who encouraged him to run for County Council. After winning the election, George tirelessly advocated for issues that many considered mundane. While the other councilors often rolled their eyes at the banal issues that George chose to focus on, his constituents appreciated someone who seemed to directly address their needs, no matter how small. The scene of him riding around Bishop Auckland and Durham on his flamboyant pink cycle also made him a fixture of the community.

As his position as a councilor was a part-time job, George supplemented his time and income by taking on an Adjunct Professorship in Philosophy & History at Durham College, and immediately fell in love with academia--while also expressing his frustration about the state of employment in higher education. To further supplement his meager income, he authored two books that were well received in academic circles, but received little traction elsewhere.

Follow the death of the owner of the cycling shop, George was shocked to find that he had been willed the store by its owner who had died childless. Considering his fondness for cycling and the important role that store had played in his life, George embraced the opportunity and kept the shop going even though he often had to cover the shortfalls in the store's finances with his own income.

After a few years on the council, the Labour Party recruited George to run as MP for Bishop Auckland in the 1979 General Election following the retirement of James Boyden. George was elected as MP and entered Parliament that year.

In Parliament, George has developed a reputation of being a quirky fixture of the chamber. George always wears a lapel pin featuring the method of transport that he has used most that day. Most days, George can be seen wearing his large, pink cycle lapel pin which is shaped just like the pink cycle that he uses to cycle to Westminster most days. He also has an array of pink lapel pens that feature a double decker bus, a train, a cab, and even a ferry. George also wears an array of colourful and quirky bow-ties which finishes his "signature look" and makes him instantly recognizable even in a crowded chamber. After Parliament became televised in this mid-80's, George's colourful look caught the eye of avid Parliament watchers and the papers. Geroge became the "face" of the cycling community in the UK and devoted much of his Parliamentary energy into championing pro-cycling policies.

Following this "minor fame", the BBC approached George in 1990 about the possibility of putting together a mini-series on the History of the UK. Given the large number of such programs, the BBC was eager to place a "twist" to draw in viewers. Given George's love of cycling, academic background in History and Philosophy, and his public image, the BBC asked him to host this series. The serious was relatively successful and was acclaimed both for the quality of the show's unique angle, and the quirkiness of George. This fame brought George a large amount of attention but also opened him up to ridicule from others. Many in Parliament thought it unseemly for one of its members to behave in such a flamboyant matter, but true to himself, George ignored this criticism.

George continues to live a colourful personal life. Given his age, his singleness, and his flamboyant appearance, there is widespread speculation that he is homosexual. George has continually refused to answer questions about his sexuality, always deflecting the question with humour or by dismissing the question as "irrelevant". George's wit is often unfiltered, and he occasionally runs into hot water by making jokes which he believes are in good fun, but which are taken as offensive by others. While he has been continually urged to filter his humour, George continues to act as he wishes often to the amusement of others.
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#6
Hon. REIGATE, Anthony Valerian, MP (b. October 12, 1929 in Mayfair, London) is the eldest child to Mr. Charles Valerian Reigate, a former civil servant and nephew to the 5th Duke of Wellington, and his wife, Mrs. Adelaide (née Somerset), the daughter of the Duke of Beaufort. Anthony was born in Mayfair but grew up between Badminton House, his mother's childhood home, in Gloucester, and Apsley House, his father's family home, in London. His childhood was idyllic, spending most of his free time on the grounds at Badminton House, running and pretending to be the King of Ragged Castle. From the age of six until he was ready to go to school, Anthony was tutored and learned cursory German and French, and studied some Shakespeare and Chaucer. By age 13, Reigate was sent to be educated at Eton College where he excelled in languages, but was poor in maths and sciences. Anthony was captain of College House during his two final years at Eton, he was elected to Pop and, likewise, was captain of College's rugby and cricket teams. Reigate was a member of the Salisbury and Wellington Societies.

Upon completion of his education, Reigate went to study classics at Balliol, Oxford. He continued to play rugger at Oxford. He joined the Oxford Union and the Bullingdon Club and read to a double first, which he received in 1950. It was while at Oxford that Reigate joined the Conservative Party and began to take an interest in politics. At Union debates, Reigate made a name for himself as a strong orator, but a staunchly right-wing Tory. When he completed his programme of study at Oxford, Reigate took a job with the Foreign Service, where he would work for 29 years, and oversee the dismantling of the British Empire. It was during his time at the Foreign Service that Reigate joined the newly-formed Conservative Monday Club, due to his political opposition to decolonization. In 1979, Reigate retired from the Foreign Service in order to travel with his wife, Louise. Over the next three years, Reigate traveled across Europe, spending six months living in Vienna. It was during this time that Reigate was converted from generic Euroscepticism to a position that there is some benefit to the European Economic Community and that Britain should remain a member of it; it was his time in Italy that taught him that further integration should be avoided.

In 1982, Reigate and his wife returned to England, settling in Gloucester, near his mother’s ancestral home. He was selected to run as the Conservative candidate in the Labour safe seat of Ashfield in the 1983 election, turning in a reasonably good performance but failing to overcome the massive deficit. In 1987 Reigate was more successful in his bid to run. Selected as the candidate for his home constituency of Gloucester, a relatively-safe Conservative seat, Anthony was returned to Westminster with a sizable majority. Within his first year, Reigate established himself as an able communicator and as proficient in policy. What really stood out about Reigate, however, was his total commitment and loyalty. Despite his membership in the fringe Monday Club, Reigate was always prepared to publicly back the Thatcher government in policy areas, even where he had a personal disagreement. His loyalty earned him a promotion, working as Undersecretary of State for Transport between 1988 and 1990 and as Undersecretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs from 1990 to the present day.

Anthony Reigate married Louise Walthingstowe, the daughter of a hotel owner, and the couple have three children. When away from Westminster, Reigate enjoys gardening and agriculture and maintains a hobby farm in his constituency. He is also an amateur brewer who often gifts his friends and colleagues with beer which he has brewed himself.
[Image: Reigate-Sig.png]
Secretary of State for Transport, Energy, and the Environment
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#7
Calum Wilson is the Labour Party MP for the Glasgow Central constituency

Born in Perthshire in January 1948, to a Catholic Mother and an affluent Protestant father, Wilson was raised in his mother’s Catholic faith. As a result, he was sent to the independent St Aloysius College in Glasgow, a Catholic private school. He spent his time outside of School back home in Perthshire where he experienced, at a young age, sectarian bigotry against the catholic community. A studious and intelligent boy, he excelled in School work but eventually struggled with his Catholic faith after a family tragedy, however he only became more devout and this led to him becoming enchanted with the more religious aspects of his schooling leading him to serve as an altar server during the mass. 
 
In his later years at St Aloysius’ he became fascinated with History, especially that of his family’s military service leading him to develop a great sense of duty, and it became one of his passions; he would also during 2 years of his time at school discern a vocation to the priesthood, however he knew it would be a lonely life and was very reluctant to make a decision. He would meet his future wife at mass one Sunday back in his home town and quickly became friends with her, spending most of his time outside of school with her, this led him to decide that he did not want to become a priest. Eventually upon leaving St Aloysius’ in 1966 he was accepted to study Law at the University of Glasgow and it would be some years before he met his future wife again. At university, he became involved in the Scottish Home Rule campaign but became dismayed when it became controlled by the Scottish Nationalists. However, despite studying Law he did not desire to become an Advocate as the sense of duty he developed led to a desire to seek a more fulfilling career. He decided in 1968 to apply to the Scottish Police College, he impressed heavily in the recruitment process and was accepted with a deferred entry until he had completed his studies at Glasgow. 
 
Once he had completed his studies he underwent the training course at the Scottish Police College and was accepted into the City of Glasgow Police Force in 1970. As a young catholic Police Officer in Glasgow he was regularly in contact with sectarian clashes, especially as his local beat was at points of his career located in the Parkhead and Govanhill areas. 4 years later in 1974 he was promoted to Sergeant, that year the City of Glasgow merged into Strathclyde Police force. Wilson joined the Criminal Investigations Department of the newly formed forces as Detective Sergeant and only two years later became a Detective Inspector. On one visit home, not long after his first promotion, he reunited with his future wife and they spent the next few days catching up, eventually the two agreed to start dating. Not long before his next promotion the couple started living together and shortly after the promotion he saw this as the perfect time to propose to her. The couple were wed in their home town during the summer of 1976 and less than a year later their first child was born. Eventually Wilson would join the Special Branch of the police force and would be promoted twice eventually reaching the rank of Superintendent and leading the Branch. 
 
As a member of Special Branch in the city of Glasgow he became determined to prevent the conflict in Northern Ireland from spilling over into the streets of Glasgow. As a catholic he had great sympathies with the local Irish community however as a unionist and a believer in Law and Order he had no sympathy for the actions of terrorists on either side of the conflict. He launched a campaign of action against groups which sympathised with and aided the paramilitary forces in Northern Ireland, and secured assistance from the Metropolitan Police and Royal Ulster Constabulary. He resisted pressure from the RUC to target pro-republican groups over Loyalist groups as he had utter contempt for both groups, a move that brought him into conflict, though not one he would back down from. At one point during this campaign he came close to death as an attempt on his life was foiled, a bomb was placed under his car however a neighbour had noticed someone tampering with the underside of the vehicle and alerted him to this. It was later revealed that the bomb was placed by a loyalist group who’s had been sending explosives to Ulster paramilitaries and bad been disrupted by the Special Branch’s actions. For his actions in leading the campaign he was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal for distinguished service.
 
During a raid on a Provisional IRA cell in Glasgow, Wilson lead the squad into the building only to be confronted by heavy gunfire and prepared defences, the republicans had been alerted to the approaching police presence and set up an ambush. A constable in Wilson’s squad was critically injured after an explosive device was detonated, Wilson rushed to the room under fire and retrieved the injured PC, in attempting to extract the PC Wilson was shot several times, most severely he was shot through the shoulder but continued to extract his wounded colleague. The Constable survived despite his injuries and Wilson’s injuries were thankfully only minor as the bullet had passed right through. For his courage under fire he was awarded the George Cross. Eventually the conflict in Northern Ireland would die down, as would the situation in Glasgow, however Wilson was still dismayed by the rampant sectarianism and called on more to be done, becoming increasingly vocal about it. In the later years the threats to safety in Scotland became less to do with the Northern Irish conflict and Wilson found himself promoted to Chief Superintendent and relegated to the more administrative tasks of policing.
 
The Scottish Papers would eventually begin to speculate that Wilson was being tipped for promotion to Assistant Chief Constable however in 1990 he unexpectedly resigned from the Police. He joined the local Labour party and was selected as the candidate for Glasgow Central, a more affluent area of the city, in the 1992 election where he won. Since taking up a seat in Parliament, Wilson has spent his spare time with his family, holidaying in rural Perthshire and watching his beloved Celtic F.C., as thanks for his work in the community he was granted a lifetime season ticket; he also became a shareholder in the club. He has also remained active in his local parish. In Parliament, he continues to push for more to be done to protect law and order, public safety and in particular he remains vocal about the need for more to be done in the fight against sectarianism.
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#8
Alastair MacLean was born in Wigtown, Scotland in 1946 to a single mother caring for three other siblings. Times were always hard in the township he grew up in, but he always found comfort in the tales of old his mother would tell them - King Arthur, Robert the Bruce, the Romans. This interest never waned, and although economically poor, MacLean was accepted into grammar school. He excelled too here and was the first student of the 20th century from his school to be granted a royal scholarship for the University of Aberdeen, where he earned a First in Celtic Studies, 1966. Before too long, MacLean enrolled to Edinburgh to earn his Doctorate, which he achieved in 1973. After spells of lecturing and academic ladder-climbing through the 1970s, MacLean became a full professor of Medieval Studies at Glasgow, with further duties as the Dean of Arts. By this point, MacLean was internationally recognised as one of the chief authorities on post-Roman Western European anthropology, and would later write critically acclaimed books in this field. Notably, considering his later political career move, one of these books dealt with historical politics and examples of pre-democratic socialism in Europe.

His star ever rising, MacLean landed the Mastership of Balliol College, Oxford in 1988 after a short spell as Chancellor of the College. His tenure was regarded as successful and productive, and served to raise his ambitions yet further. 

His reign as Master at an end, MacLean decided to run for MP of Edinburgh Central. This venture failed, but learning from this experience, he was elected for Edinburgh East, Labour, the next year.

MacLean is an exceedingly intelligent individual, though he has never been one to use his smarts for malice, instead driven by a deep-seated desire for justice and the triumph of equality for all. 
Known for his razor-sharp, often sardonic wit, MacLean is no small meal in the debate hall, though sometimes it seems his brash mouth can go too far. A laid back, humourous but often determined man, Dr. MacLean is known to be a deceptively calm presence in Parliament.

Alastair MacLean was born in Wigtown, Scotland in 1946 to a single mother caring for three other siblings. Times were always hard in the township he grew up in, but he always found comfort in the tales of old his mother would tell them - King Arthur, Robert the Bruce, the Romans. This interest never waned, and although economically poor, MacLean was accepted into grammar school. He excelled too here and was the first student of the 20th century from his school to be granted a royal scholarship for the University of Aberdeen, where he earned a First in Celtic Studies, 1966. Before too long, MacLean enrolled to Edinburgh to earn his Doctorate, which he achieved in 1973. After spells of lecturing and academic ladder-climbing through the 1970s, MacLean became a full professor of Medieval Studies at Glasgow, with further duties as the Dean of Arts. By this point, MacLean was internationally recognised as one of the chief authorities on post-Roman Western European anthropology, and would later write critically acclaimed books in this field. Notably, considering his later political career move, one of these books dealt with historical politics and examples of pre-democratic socialism in Europe.

His star ever rising, MacLean landed the Mastership of Balliol College, Oxford in 1988 after a short spell as Chancellor of the College. His tenure was regarded as successful and productive, and served to raise his ambitions yet further. 

His reign as Master at an end, MacLean decided to run for MP of Edinburgh Central. This venture failed, but learning from this experience, he was elected for Edinburgh East, Labour, the next year.

MacLean is an exceedingly intelligent individual, though he has never been one to use his smarts for malice, instead driven by a deep-seated desire for justice and the triumph of equality for all. 
Known for his razor-sharp, often sardonic wit, MacLean is no small meal in the debate hall, though sometimes it seems his brash mouth can go too far. A laid back, humourous but often determined man, Dr. MacLean is known to be a deceptively calm presence in Parliament.
Dr. Alastair MacLean, PhD
Shadow Foreign Secretary
Shadow for Education and Employment 
MP for Edinburgh East
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#9
   

Dayton Highland was born Alexander Wylie Dayton Campbell, in Dumbarton, Scotland on the 17th May 1959, to Claire Highland, an Irish nurse, and Alexander Campbell, a Scottish factory worker. Highland's first few years in the world were turbulent. His father was an alcoholic and abusive to his over-worked and depressed mother, with his sister Elizabeth taking charge when his parents were incapable of doing so. In 1964, Alexander Sr. died following an accident at work, and the remaining family moved in with his mother's sister in the Cardonald district of Glasgow. It was here that two major influences on Highland's life took shape - his mother's devout Catholic faith, and his uncle's involvement in politics as a Communist Party councillor. From the age of 13, due to a local manager short on staff and willing to overlook the rules for a boy who needed to provide for his family, he had worked at a local Safeway when he wasn't at school, an experience that made a great impact on him as he grew.

Studying at Lourdes Secondary School, a Catholic school, he developed both a keen interest in History and English, in particular literature. It was at Lourdes also that he met Malcolm Urqhuart, with whom he would form a close friendship with, the results of which would have a major effect on his future. Studying at Lourdes also put great strain on his faith, as he began to feel like the Catholic faith was too repressive and holding him back somehow. After graduating from Lourdes, he began to study History at the University of Strathclyde, before taking a postgraduate course in Secondary Education, and finally taking a job at Williamwood High School near Eastwood, just outside of Glasgow. Although he had a keen interest in history, he soon found that teaching and working with children wasn't for him, and after a year and a half, he gave it up and resigned.

Now unemployed, Highland struggled with depression, calling 1983 "the single worst year of my life." A chance meeting with his old friend Malcolm Urquhart in January 1984 was to change the track of his life forever. Urquhart, now a producer at Radio Clyde, asked Highland to present a late night show as the presenter had fallen ill, and also introduced him to the chair of the Eastwood Conservative Association, who asked him if he wanted join the party. Highland was at first reluctant. His working class background had instilled in him a deep rooted opposition to the Tories, but Highland's deep personal objection to hardline socialism and communism, compounded by his childhood experience of a dominating and abusive uncle, a communist councillor, convinced him that joining the Conservatives was the best way to make a change. He agreed to both, and hosted the first edition of what would soon be "The Highland Show" in January 1984. The show was that well received that, after a few more guest appearances, he was offered the Saturday afternoon slot, a talk programme which received widespread praise and made Highland a household name in the west of Scotland.

It was this new found name recognition that would give Highland an entry to the world of politics. In 1985, a resignation created a vacancy on the Strathclyde Regional Council, in the Eastwood South ward. The local Conservative association, worried about losing the seat to a strong Liberal by-election campaign, contacted Highland and asked him to stand, hoping that his "star power" would swing it for them in a marginal seat. Highland was incredibly torn about the decision, worried that his decision to officially stand as a Conservative candidate would alienate his predominately anti-Conservative audience, and from his socialist family. Eventually, after much deliberation, he decided he would stand. Although his audience disagreed with his politics, the show's listeners remained high, and many conceded that "for a Tory, he speaks a lot of sense." At the by-election, the star power did have an effect, and Highland won, albeit with a reduced majority versus the last Conservative candidate. This however, compounded with his eventual decision in 1986 to leave the Catholic Church, was too much for his family relationship, which has never recovered. Despite winning, it appeared that Highland had lost a lot more.

This was only the beginning of Highland's problems, however. An editorial decision moved his show to a later slot, viewing figures slumped, and he only held his seat by 3 votes at the next election. Things would get worse, however, on an ill-fated visit to Malcolm Urquhart at his home in Kintyre. The two were involved in a car accident, of which they both escaped without serious injury, however later the same day, a gas explosion at Urquhart's home occured, killing Urquhart, and critically injuring Highland, the cause of which is still under investigation to this day. Highland was left with bad burns to the right hand side of his body, deafened partially in one ear and a totally shattered kneecap. Although doctors were able to repair the knee to the best of their ability, he still walks with a bad impediment and is often in serious pain.

During his long and painful recovery, Highland rediscovered his love for English literature. Whilst at home recovering, he began to write a manuscript that would later come to be known as Darkmoor, a fantasy novel loosely based on his own childhood, experiences at school, and nightmares he had had following the explosion. After having originally abandoned any idea of publishing it after returning to work, a lunch meeting with Radio Clyde staff and others introduced him to a publisher, who put him in contact with others, one of whom decided to publish the book. Darkmoor was a quick success, becoming a Sunday Times bestseller, and sparking a sequel, Clouds and Clocks, in 1990, increasing Highlands profile across the UK.

1990 would also be the year that Highland took a dive into national politics. Influenced by a meeting with Jean-Marie Le Pen on a visit to France promoting Clouds and Clocks, and his National Front's breakthrough on populist policies, he began to research the small but growing European populist movement further, making notes and observations that would later evolve into his 1991 book and "manifesto" Vox Populi. Subtitled Democracy and Accountability in the United Kingdom, Highland makes a decidedly unconservative move towards supporting direct democracy, saying that both the Conservative and Labour parties have failed in addressing the needs of the people, and remarking that the actions of the National Front in the late 70's and early 80's was only the "visible symptom of a deeper issue - many people in this country feel like the elites are selling them down the river." Determined to bring his vision of a compassionate conservative future driven by popular support to Parliament, he briefly considered leaving the Conservatives and running in Eastwood as an independent in 1992. However, with a vacancy for the marginal Ayr seat opening, he put his name on the ballot for the Conservative nomination, and narrowly won. Despite some controversy over his views, he won the seat, by less than a hundred votes.
A.W. Dayton Highland
Member of Parliament for Ayr (1992 - present)
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