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Marty
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Re: BBC One

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Daily Politics Queen's Speech 2015 Special - Day One

Andrew Neil
Morning folks, welcome to this Queen's Speech Daily Politics special. I'm joined today by Laura Kuenssberg for a discussion on the recent opening of Parliament and the agenda of this new Labour government. Later this morning, I'll be joined by Charles Webster, Andrew Lam and Euan Urquhart for their reactions to the Queen's Speech.

Laura Kuenssberg
Good morning Andrew.

Andrew Neil
Laura, I know you've already offered some written commentary on the Queen's Speech, but now that you've had the chance to see both leaders speak, do you have anything you want to add to that?

Laura Kuenssberg
Well, it's certainly been a lively debate so far - although I wouldn't really have expected any less given the seismic changes we've seen since the general election. It's certainly been the most unusual Queen's Speech debate I ever watched. You had the mover and seconder, humorous as usual, and then I think many will have been glued to their television sets as Deborah Crowther and Will Black, two new leaders at least one of whom nobody would've expected to see there, crossed swords for the first time. It's certainly setting the tone for business at Westminster for the coming years more than usual, Andrew.

Andrew Neil
I agree, Laura. Though the Queen was eloquent as always, the main event was really watching Deborah Crowther and Will Black face each other for the first time. And I think we can say that they're both quite different than their predecessors. Crowther, thus far, in terms of style; Black, more noticeably, in terms of ideology. And they both certainly have their cases to make before the public: Deborah Crowther talking about broken promises and Will Black talking about the end of austerity.

Laura Kuenssberg
Well, Crowther certainly packed no punches. I said that the opposition's case was likely going to seize on the nervousness many who voted for Labour will be feeling over a very important question: will they get what they voted for? I think one thing that's remarkable in that regard is that the Prime Minister only mentioned the manifesto once. He seemed to want to argue that in fact, the people did vote for everything that was in the Queen's Speech. But with such a forceful attack from Crowther and nervousness in the markets, I'm not so sure that isn't a very tall argument. He'll have set his base cheering as he did his MPs, but whether this People's Government will sell with the people who actually won Labour its mandate this time and indeed every government's since 1997 and even before is still an open question in many minds.

Andrew Neil
Indeed, I think you're right Laura, and we've got some choice segments of the debate that we can roll right now.

Laura Kuenssberg
looks over at the screen

Manifesto Clips Roll
Deborah Crowther: "The Chancellor can make as many flashy television appearances waving around the manifesto as he likes, Mr. Speaker. But that means nothing when, away from the glare of the cameras, they set that same manifesto alight..."
Will Black: "We are unwavering in our commitment to meet and exceed the promises we made to the British people during the general election"
Andrew Neil
As the two leaders speak past each other here, we see exactly the dynamic you were speaking about. Deborah Crowther, on the other hand, deftly accuses the Prime Minister and Labour of taking their manifesto and setting it alight. The Prime Minister, Will Black, basically says that's exactly what the government is doing: that thay're determined to go beyond the manifesto - and that they will be "unwavering" in doing so.

Laura Kuenssberg
Which is exactly what the doctor ordered, or not a good look at all, depending on who you ask. The CBI will certainly not be happy to watch it burn - we already saw that unprecedented warning. That may set the likes of what I called "the two Lens" this morning cheering and egging the PM on, but here's the problem - Middle England will certainly be looking at the CBI with less disgust and more concern than Labour. Now, every government to some extent exceeds its manifesto during its term, if only because circumstances change from the moment they were elected. The problem here is you've got a government declaring that intention after a leadership election in the aftermath of a victorious general election. There may be no precedent for that, but that's a big risk to take. If they can't convince the public that they are in fact giving them what they voted for, they'll have to deliver good outcomes - and the shakiness in the markets is not a good sign for them on that front.

Andrew Neil
Your point about all governments exceeding their manifesto during their term is true. But the real crux of the issue is that they don't usually declare to exceed their manifesto on what is essentially day one of the job. And that caution from the CBI might have been a gut reaction on their part - but it could also be the real reaction of its members. Other industry groups will need to be closely watched over the coming months.

Of course, the public right now is being told that they've just been given a hard left Labour government, not the centre left Labour government that they elected. And that message is largely resonating. Deborah Crowther has some eminently quotable lines in her speech. Will Black did to - particularly when he didn't use the phrase "People's Government". But Deborah we more quotable - and we might see that in the papers tomorrow.

Laura Kuenssberg
Almost certainly, I'd say, Andrew, although of course the Conservatives have their Achilles' heel as well. They were voted out of office for a reason, and Labour sure won't let them forget it. The problem is this - they're no longer in government. Any government gets to criticise its predecessor - the Cameron Ministry did that in ample amounts throughout the last Parliament - but in the end, they are now in charge. Criticising the opposition only brings you so much, and is not without its risks.

Which brings me to the subject of austerity...

Andrew Neil
Indeed, the leader's had a lot to say on austerity: Deborah offering a warning while Will Black declared it dead and over. Let's see what they had to say...

Laura Kuenssberg
looks taken aback at being interrupted, but recuperates quickly to watch the screen
Borrowing & Austerity Clips
Will Black: "Austerity has failed the working people of this country, and the Government's agenda aims to be the final nail in austerity's coffin."
Deborah Crowther: "It seems this radical left government wishes to take us in the same direction. When you borrow more today, it is the generations, public services and businesses of the future that suffer."
Andrew Neil
Now, it's important to note that, later on, Will Black did commit to reducing the deficit each year - but it was really a throwaway line. Not something that one would expect after an election fought, in part, on fiscal responsibility. But his priority is very clearly ending austerity. Deborah Crowther was much more cagey on the subject - I think it's clear she wants to move past austerity and recognises that her party needs to do so in wake of the election. But she's always got one hand clutching her purse and is watching the deficit closely, aptly pointing out that just trying to spend your way out of any problem carries risks.

Laura Kuenssberg
Quite. In that sense, it quite resembled the quick mention of the manifesto. When it comes to austerity and borrowing, however, it's good to keep in mind that both parties have a problem here, but on opposite sides of the debate. As you said, Crowther will likely continue the Conservative policy of watching that deficit very closely, but she also has to move on from austerity because as we saw with the outcry about George Osborne's controversial cuts in the latter days of the coalition, people are very quick to start minding austerity when its results become painfully clear. At the same time, however, a large part of people did share the impulse of the coalition to tighten their belts, and there's the challenge for Labour. We've seen them condemn austerity full stop. That carries with it risks of being accused of being fiscally irresponsible - while what won them the election was the argument against the unfair and adverse effects of austerity, things like the benefit cuts and the bedroom tax, not so much opposition to austerity itself. It's a balancing act both parties will have to do, and it will likely be complicated even further by hardliners in both parties rearing to polarise against the other's perceived extreme stances.

Andrew Neil
It certainly is a delicate balancing act. There is absolutely a need to be seen as fiscally responsible - not just for the public, but potentially for a more important party: the markets, specifically gilt markets. A lot of the public want more spending on public services, they also want lower taxes, a stable economy, and lower debt. Getting all of those things to balance out is a puzzle.

One might wonder if Labour's strategy is to go big and hope they can get a public services bump and call a snap election before the debt speedbump is hit.

Ending austerity and a public spending bump is certainly to be favourable in the short term. People love the idea of a stronger NHS and better schools.

Laura Kuenssberg
I have to say, I don't know Will Black well enough to say whether he's a gambling man or not!

Andrew Neil
It's a very slim majority, so he has to be looking at making a splash now and then seeking a new mandate. And this Queen's Speech certainly makes a splash.

Laura Kuenssberg
Seriously though, the public services are a key issue. The coalition slashed them by quite a lot. However, the needed investment will cost a lot of money. If Parliament takes but a year, balancing the deficit is going to be difficult.

Andrew Neil
Of course, both leaders are making a splash with some of their words and not just on public services. rolls clip

Laura Kuenssberg
It's certainly a very bold proposition, I agree with you in that.

shuts up
Clips
Black: This is a People's Government that plans to take our country in a new direction, and to commit ourselves to pursuing a more just, fair, and decent society for all.
Crowther: It was, if I may be frank Mr. Speaker, more Marxism than Milibandism.
Andrew Neil
Anyway, Laura, let's hear your thoughts - the battle lines are drawn, as we can see. Where do the parties go from here?

Laura Kuenssberg
We'll likely see some more of the same tough rhetoric from both sides. It's clear both sides believe they have a strong argument that packs no punches and will win in the end. However, as I said, both have very clear pitfalls. I'd say the playing field is easier for the Conservatives than for the Government, and that's a reversed situation from a normal Queen's Speech. That's got everything to do with the boldness of the proposition on offer, and the perceived departures from the manifesto. Now, that doesn't mean Labour is bound to lose this first parliamentary battle, but I think they'll have to very strongly make the case either that this is in fact what the manifesto offered, or that it is what people should want - and I'll note that with their pitfall on austerity, playing delayed Official Opposition will likely have limited effect where it matters. Similarly, the Tories need to be careful not to be too shrill in condemning spendthrift and ideology - they've lost, and some of the effects of their policies have hit people hard and caused that defeat. It's all to play for - and it'll be interesting what else the debate will throw up once more MPs get to wade in.

Andrew Neil
Well, thank you Laura. And speaking of MPs wading in, we've got three guests here ready and waiting to do just that. That is, after your chance to win that prized Daily Politics mug with Guess the Year...

(clip rolls)

Andrew Neil
Send your answers to this address for your chance to win that exclusive Daily Politics mug.

Now, Laura's still here and there's three guests who are no doubt going to want to tell us why their pary is the real winner - and the other the clear loser. Charles Webster, MP for Aberavon and former Blairite opponent of the new dear leader. Shadow Home Secretary Andrew Lam, for the Tories. And fellow Scot, the SNP's Westminster Leader Euan Urquhart.

Welcome to the Daily Politics.

Andrew Lam
smiles and gives that slight polite nod. Thank you.

Euan Urquhart
Good afternoon Andrew, you're looking well.

Dr. Charles Webster
Thank you for having me.

Andrew Neil
Now let's start with you, Mr. Webster, because you were quite critical of the Prime Minister's Movement while you were facing him - and indeed after, when you refused to serve in his Cabinet. I presume you have mixed feelings on this Queen's Speech?

Dr. Charles Webster
I'm quite proud of most of the Queen's speech, focusing on an agenda that will restore public services and make sure that the NHS and education are much stronger than they would've been under any Tory Government. I'm very interested in seeing the exact proposals of the devolution, and while the Leader of the Opposition didn't focus on it. Mr. Black did make sure that a number of key manifesto pledges were kept including the expansion of vote. We have many more years in Government to make sure that we meet or exceed the other promises in the manifesto.

Andrew Neil
That's quite a remarkable change of tone, isn't it? Are you at all concerned that Mrs Crowther might prove right about your party's policies, especially after that CBI warning?

Dr. Charles Webster
In the end I think the CBI may be overreacting there. My party remains committed to meeting the manifesto pledges which means keeping the most competitive Corporate tax rate in the G7. Prime Minister Black is trying to make sure the economy is stronger and more fair post recession and that includes making our public services stronger and keeping our manifesto pledges.(bewerkt)

Andrew Neil
Mr. Lam, what do you make of that? Is the CBI overreacting?

Andrew Lam
Not at all. If there's one thing that businesses need to thrive, it's predictability. And with a manifesto and a commitment to uphold it, they at least get that when it comes to planning. Now, the Prime Minister has said there is no predictability. He's proudly torched the manifesto with new promises, with new costs, and with no way right now to predict what that's going to do. I think the CBI is absolutely right to be concerned- because we don't know what's going to come out of this, aside from some rather bombastic promises.

Euan Urquhart
checks twitter quickly and slightly smiles

Euan gets caught on a shot checking his phone

Andrew Neil
chuckles.
I think the Scots are feeling a bit neglected. Don't worry, we'll get to you soon, Mr. Urquhart.

Euan Urquhart
That's one sentence to sum up the last 300 odd years, Andrew. winks.

Dr. Charles Webster
Smiles

Andrew Neil
Is that true though? Mr. Webster? About spending, not about the Scots.

Dr. Charles Webster
I cannot possibly comment on the Scots...However I don't believe that comment about spending is true, Prime Minister Black said a number of times confirming our commitment to a balancing the budget and to the manifesto we were elected on, the notion that he set the manifesto on fire is fundamentally false. This government will honor the manifesto, and go further.

Andrew Lam
If I may, we're being told that this Government will "meet or exceed" promises. When I hear that from McVitie's about the number of biscuits I get, that's great. From governments, that should be absolutely concerning because we all pay that cost. I'm from Hong Kong, and I know there would be a lot of people disappointed if another self-styled People's Government decided to "meet or exceed" certain promises made to the people of Hong Kong. Surely that might be of concern to the Government too, right, Charles, or is throwing out commitments and "meeting or exceeding" alright there as well?

Andrew Neil
Well? Let me put this in a way that facilitates a short answer, Mr. Webster: Marx or Miliband?

Dr. Charles Webster
Miliband. Though I very much dislike the comparison of our Government with the Authoritarian, Human rights abusing People's Republic of China.

Andrew Neil
So, not Mao. chuckles.

Euan Urquhart
looks slightly puzzled by the way this conversation has veered completely off topic

Andrew Lam
I'm not comparing this Government to China. For instance, we have a strong opposition- in fact several parties- that will hold this Government to account. Whether it's on spending promises, taxation, or even Scotland.

Andrew Neil
Well, from Beijing back to Scotland now. Mr. Urquhart, are you impressed by the government's political reforms?

Euan Urquhart
I don't think the people of Scotland will put much by the way of a Tory MP saying they're going to stand up for Scottish interests, but I thank you for the backhanded compliment about the strong increased SNP group at Westminster Mr Lam.

Andrew, as always the devil will be in what the detail actually is. What may look impressive on paper and what can be delivered by a Government with a wafer thin majority and truculent backbench malcontents motions slightly are two very separate issues. But if we want to look in to what was promised in the leadership election, and what came out in this Queen's Speech - it's a Tale of Two William Black's.

He was for House of Lords reform in the leadership election, now the only mention of it was by the Queen herself when she said 'My Lords'. And beyond William Black, James Valentine is on the record that the House of Lords would QUOTE be gone by the end of this Parliament. Labour rhetoric and Labour reality do not add up.

Andrew Neil
Let's ask the backbench malcontent, then. Are you going to support every part of this agenda? Does Euan have reason to be worried here?

Dr. Charles Webster
I do not believe that Euan has a reason to be worried here, the Government will meet it's promises for devolution for both Scotland and Wales, ending the house of Lords. I will personally make sure that the Barnett formula is reformed for Wales within this parliament. I think Mr. Urquhart forgets that this government will last more than one year. The House of Lords will be replaced by a senate within the life of this parliament so it can be elected in the next general election.

Euan Urquhart
Charles, we have the votes in Parliament to abolish the House of Lords tomorrow. Why won't the Prime Minister put it up?

Andrew Neil
I can't help noting you did not tell us if you were planning to vote for, say, nationalization preparations. Doesn't that fly right in the face of your Blairite convictions?

Euan Urquhart
I'm glad that Charles has brought up Devolution, Andrew. smiles broadly

Andrew Neil
We'll get to that. First, I want to ask Mr. Webster - and I'm also quite interested for Mr. Lam to offer reflection on what he's about to say.

Dr. Charles Webster
I have to see what the actual plan is, I do believe the plan especially for energy will be more akin to the manifesto than full nationalization of energy. And if it is, I will vote for it.

Laura Kuenssberg
And if it isn't? Sorry, but isn't this kind of the problem with your party right now? That question - what if it isn't?

Andrew Lam
Nods at that

Euan Urquhart
Hasn't Bill been on the phone yet to tell you what the plan is? After all, there were only 300 votes between you.

Dr. Charles Webster
Through my talks with the Prime Minister I do not believe it will be outside of promises from the manifesto. So I don't believe I will have to worry about what if it isn't, for nationalization. In general I believe that the Prime Minister is carefully weighing the benefits of going beyond the manifesto, and making sure it is in the best interest of the country.

Andrew Lam
This goes back to what I've mentioned before- and even what Euan has before. The devil's in the details, and we don't have them. Businesses and families need predictability, and we don't have it. Charles can merely HOPE that this Government sticks to its manifesto when it comes to nationalisation... and meanwhile when we finally do see what comes out, we'll all be paying for it for decades to come.

Andrew Neil
I don't understand how it can be within the manifesto, Mr Webster. Taking into public ownership is very different from the manifesto commitment of more regulation and competition amongst the private energy companies. How do you square that circle?

Euan Urquhart
I can't quite get my head around Charles Webster being sent on to a national political programme so woefully under briefed on what his own party's policies are going to be... either he doesn't know, or Mr Black is concealing it from him for fear of reprisal.

Andrew Neil
Not everyone can be as savvy a political operator as us Scots, Euan.

Dr. Charles Webster
The Queen's speech promised to lay the ground work for nationalization, and I was led to believe that would mean focusing on the manifesto pledges in this parliament, and anything else will be done after we got a mandate to do so.

Euan Urquhart
eyes widen

Andrew Lam
So if nationalisation came up, you'd vote against?

Andrew Neil
So there will be no nationalisations this Parliament?

Dr. Charles Webster
None that I will vote for.

Euan Urquhart
Have you told the Prime Minister that Charles?

Dr. Charles Webster
I have.

Andrew Lam
I feel like the Prime Minister would definitely know now...

Andrew Neil
I think I just saw James Flynn's eyes widen significantly.

Euan Urquhart
Andrew, if I may, these revelations from Charles Webster today highlight what I said earlier on. This Queen's Speech just can't be taken at face value, because we don't know which bits the Prime Minister is going to be forced to chuck at the beckon call of the man who speaks for the other half of the Labour Party.

Andrew Lam
I just hope that the Prime Minister gets the message and doesn't bring any nationalisations up- but I have to ask, has there been any nationalisations floated so far? Because if we're laying the groundwork as you said... there clearly are some ideas.

Laura Kuenssberg
If I may, Andrew.

Andrew Neil
cannot believe a woman is cutting in

Laura Kuenssberg
I think another problem just got added to Will Black's list - or rather it was already on the list, and surfaced. The government's majority is 10, and many New Labourites like Mr. Webster here will not be happy with supporting nationalization. It's doubtful whether he's got the votes even if he wanted, and we've just seen that inevitable problem rear its head. It's another reason Labour should tread carefully. The benches opposite is one thing, but I get the sense that Will Black will have to look behind him as well - and not just from Mr. Webster here.

Not sure how that would impact political reforms though, to be honest. Surely Scottish devolution won't be as controversial?

Andrew Neil
We have to keep out promises to Scotland, Laura. Though I'm thinking there's going to be a healthy debate between Home Rule and the Smith Commission's recommendations.

Euan Urquhart
In the dying days of the referendum, the No campaign and ex PM Gordon Brown promised the people of Scotland the closest thing to modern Home Rule if we voted to stay in the United Kingdom. Then the Smith Commission promptly rejected that with a series of proposals, which -although welcome- do not fulfil that promise which was made. I think Scots have given this Union one more chance, and whilst I will examine the Prime Minister's proposals very closely, the serial flip flopping from Labour on more powers for Scotland doesn't augur well at this moment in time.

Likewise, the SNP will resist any attempts to slash Scotland's budget by the backdoor as a result of a botched Home Rule proposal designed to punish the Scottish Parliament rather than empower it.

Andrew Lam
And there's a question of consultations. Will they consult with Scotland? Or decide for themselves what "meet or exceed" means.

Euan Urquhart
I believe that independence is still the best outcome for Scotland, and I will continue to fight for it as I have done my entire political life. But as Alex Salmond himself said on that September morning; Scotland can still come out of this on top. It is with that in mind that I will hold the Westminster politicians to account on their promises to Scotland. Hell hath no fury like a Scotsman scorned, if I can twist a phrase ever so slightly.

Andrew Lam
laughs. And that's why, if anything, I'm including Euan in the "strong opposition" comment. I know he won't sit silent on this issue.

Euan Urquhart
And if William Black or any other London politician tries to play the Scottish people for fools, like Scottish Labour has done for the last decade, then he will see what a nation united really looks like.

laughs alongside Lam Andrew does make a good point there Andrew, and I've tabled a question to the Prime Minister on that point. It would be unthinkable for him to push ahead with a new Scotland Bill without the consultation of the Scottish Government.

Andrew Neil
Mr Webster you're being awfully quiet: is it full home rule, the Smith Commission, or something else that Labour will be serving for Scotland?

Euan Urquhart
But don't think I'm letting Andrew Lam off the hook either Andrew - because if the Tories had got back in, I'd shortly have been a second class MP in this so called 'Union of Equals'.
When there've been more pandas in Scotland than Tory MPs until quite recently, you can see why that wouldn't have bothered them very much.

Dr. Charles Webster
I have not talked to the Prime Minister about his plans for Scotland. I would be certain whatever his plans are it will be done with the full consultation with the Scottish Parliament. I can speak though I will be making sure this Government meets the manifesto pledges it made in terms of Welsh Devolution especially in regards to to getting a fair funding settlement for Wales.

Andrew Neil
Well, I'm certain the Welsh will look forward to that.

Andrew Lam
Yet again, no predictability. So more and more we see the CBI were very right to be concerned.

Dr. Charles Webster
I have not talked to the Prime Minister about his plans for Scotland. I would be certain whatever his plans are it will be done with the full consultation with the Scottish Parliament. I can speak though I will be making sure this Government meets the manifesto pledges it made in terms of Welsh Devolution especially in regards to to getting a fair funding settlement for Wales.

Euan Urquhart
Is that an admission that Labour Government since 99 has been bad for Wales?

Dr. Charles Webster
No, the Coalition government cut the budget of Wales by 1.5 Billion dollars. The Labour Manifesto promised to get a funding floor for Wales and improve the funding situation, and I plan on making sure we deliver.

Andrew Neil
So that's budgets up all around and no spending cuts in the future?

Euan Urquhart
Last time I checked they still use the pound sterling in Wales, Charles.

Dr. Charles Webster
I do not see this Government cutting the Welsh budget.

Andrew Neil
Any last comments before we move on?

Laura Kuenssberg
Well, just the observation that there seems to be a big difference of opinion about what fiscal responsibility means.

Andrew Lam
I would imagine that the voters that chose this Government would say that about a lot of things. And yet we have our current Speech from the Throne. I wish we could do more than just "hope" or "be sure of" something. But until we are, it's going to be difficult to know what the costs are going to be to families, to businesses, and to this country.

Andrew Neil
Now, I've had a few messages - not a word about my phone, Laura - going back the nationalisations and public ownership. The Labour manifesto promised to retain the government's 30% stake in Royal Mail. The government are committing to nationalisation. Mr Webster first, followed by Mr Lam and Mr Urquhart, should the government keep it's 30% stake in Royal Mail? Should it be increased, decreased? Or is public ownership the answer?

Laura Kuenssberg
glares momentarily, then conceals it with a laugh

Dr. Charles Webster
It should keep it's 30% stake in the royal mail.

Andrew Lam
I hope that the Prime Minister agrees, but we'll see about that. As it stands there's no reason for us to increase that stake. I think that the moves that have been made so far are good for Royal Mail, and that its good for the government to maintain its current stake for the time being

Euan Urquhart
The Royal Mail was shamefully flogged off by the last Tory-Liberal Government to their mates in the hedge funds and the City. It is is a crucial national asset and must be brought back in to public ownership as a matter of urgency. As a rural MP with a number of islands in my constituency, I know only too well that the lifeline service the Royal Mail provides is too precious to be in the hands of corporate raiders who only care about squeezing profit rather than the public service obligation to the people of this country who have come to cherish it.

And now that Charles has said he doesn't want it nationalised, that'll be the Prime Minister put right back in his place. If I could characterise the two of them right now - they're like conjoined twins who are desperate to get away from each other. Will Black's public commitments and his political realities do not match up.

Andrew Neil
But surely the universal service commitment that Labour put forward at the election would assuage your concerns about your rural constituents, Euan?

Euan Urquhart
No Andrew, it certainly doesn't assuage those concerns. And crucially it doesn't safeguard JOBS in what is already a fragile rural economy. In many parts of Scotland, not just the Highlands and Islands - the local postman, and post office, are at risk of being made redundant as part of false cost cutting measures. A universal service commitment is a commitment to the bare minimum, not to safeguarding a deeply loved institution.

Andrew Neil
Thank you all for being here. Unfortunately, that's out time for today.

Andrew Lam
Nods again. Thank you... in some ways, very enlightening. Look forward to working with you both in Parliament in the days ahead.

Andrew Neil
Laura, a pleasure as always. We'll be back soon with more coverage of the Queen's Speech and this first test of the Black Ministry.

Laura Kuenssberg
Looking forward to it.

Dr. Charles Webster
Thank you. I am looking forward to further debate with both of you in parliament.

Euan Urquhart
Andrew, a pleasure in more ways than one.
I'll be back soon. Mar sin leat.

Andrew Neil
Well folks, that's all for today. Tomorrow, we'll be back to review the next day of the Queen's Speech debate, and Thursday on This Week, we'll speak with Michael Portillo and Diane Abbott on what this means for Britain. Quite a lot to look forward to. Have a nice day, and goodbye.

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