MS-X | Brexit Deal

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That this House passes the legislation at Third Reading

Poll runs till Fri Jun 18, 2021 8:46 am

Aye
11
65%
No
4
24%
Abstain/Present
0
No votes
Absent
0
No votes
Admin
2
12%
 
Total votes: 17

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MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Juliet Manning MP »

THAT THIS HOUSE welcomes the agreement between the United Kingdom, the European Union and the European Free Trade Association; endorses and authorises the ascension of the United Kingdom to the European Free Trade Association from 30 September 2020; and hereby ratifies that agreement

https://www.efta.int/media/documents/le ... eement.pdf

https://www.efta.int/sites/default/file ... eement.pdf
Rt Hon. Mrs Juliet Manning MP
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Juliet Manning MP »

Mr Speaker,

Four years ago, 17 million citizens of the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. And 16 million voted to remain.

The leave voters were concentrated in our left-behind communities; in the north-east, in the old industrial towns, in my own homelands in Wales. The remain voters were concentrated in the major cities, in Scotland and in Northern Ireland.

For four long years, successive governments have grappled with the problem of Brexit. Uncertainty, unclarity and division racked our isles. For four long years, Brexit dominated the resources of government; exposing the apparatus of the state as woefully unrepresentative of the nation at large, and woefully unprepared for a challenge of such scale. Since 1973, Britain had been an intrinsic part of the European Union, and unravelling all those years of close cooperation and integration was a bureaucrat’s nightmare.

All along, the criticism came that the government was doing too little to listen: too little to learn. Leave campaigners who had once pledged no end to single market access now rallied behind a hard Brexit on WTO terms. Remain campaigners refused to accept the result, and committed themselves to frustrating Brexit at all costs. And in the middle, the silent, decent majority - the ordinary people, not enthralled by the political minutiae of this House and its committees, just prayed for us to get on with it and get the job done. As the nation seemed to polarise to extremes and opposing sides were labelled uneducated fools, racists and left-wing traitors, the people in the middle, as ever, were unheeded.

Delivering Brexit was never going to be a simple process. And in the end, the solution to this ultimate question would always have had to be a compromise.

Compromise is an ugly word in British politics. It seems to imply splitting the difference; taking the easy road; finding a solution that all can bear, but of which none can be proud. This is a product of our adversarial system, which pits good people on all sides against one another in the toxic atmosphere of the 24-hour news cycle, the desperate spin and the spectre of scandal.

But compromise was, and is, the only solution.

It is right that the will of those who voted to leave is honoured, and that the promises made to those voters are kept: thus Brexit must be fulfilled. But it is right too that the legitimate concerns and fears of those who voted to remain are heard. It is right that as we leave the European Union, taking advantage of new freedoms to offer hope to those who have lived too long without it, we preserve existing rights, privileges and opportunities to protect the interests of those who owe much to Europe. It is right that as we advance the will of those English industrial towns, those Welsh mining villages, we protect the place of those Scottish cities and the planes of Northern Ireland in our United Kingdom.

No Brexit would have devastated trust in democracy and left our politics in tatters. A no-deal Brexit would have thrown our country into chaos, left Scotland’s place in the union uncertain, and found into flame the embers of old animosities as peace in Northern Ireland was put at risk. And so the government is proposing to deliver the best deal, the most rational and realistic deal, and the only deal possible.

The Brexit agreement negotiates by this government and its team of negotiators - and I must give thanks to such figures as Oliver Robbins, Philip Rycroft and Clare Moriarty, who made all this possible - represents the best of both worlds for Britain. It delivers Brexit and extracts the UK entire and whole and perfect from the European Union, whilst preserving our precious union and putting new trade opportunities into partnership with the preservation of our existing enterprise alliance.

Under the terms of this new deal, the Implementation Period will end on 30 September, and the United Kingdom will upon that date accede to the European Free Trade Association - of which it was once, many decades ago, a founding member. In joining the EFTA it will stand alongside Iceland, Norway, Lichtenstein and Switzerland in retaining access to the European Economic Area - the European Single Market which was itself an innovation led by the British under Margaret Thatcher - whilst withdrawing from the political apparatus of the EU. Britain will be inside the Single Market, retaining access to a shared market which dwarves even China an the United States on free trading terms. But we will be outside of the Customs Union and thus free to negotiate our own new free trade agreements around the world. We will be outside the Common Fisheries Policy, giving us the freedom to defend our fishermen from Land’s End to John O’Groats. We will be outside the Common Agricultural Policy, ending the days of extensive tax-funded subsidies to continental farmers. And we will be excluded from the commitment to ever-closer union which is today enshrined in EU law. We will also once again be free from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice, whose judgements over the years have so irked those who wanted to see British sovereignty over her courts restored.

This is not a puritanical Brexit. It is not a Brexit that tears Britain wholesale out of the European economy in a no-deal scenario, which the government’s own projections suggest could leave the UK economy nearly 10% smaller over 15 years. Neither is it a limp-wristed Brexit: it is not a deal which retains membership of the Customs Union, the supremacy of ECJ rulings, the considerable payments into the CAP and CFP, and membership of the political institutions of the EU. It is a realistic, rational and effective Brexit deal: the only deal on offer, the only deal possible, and the only deal that this House has time to implement before the clock strikes zero and the ultimate consequence of no-deal is realised.

I know it is not a deal with which everyone will be happy. But it is a deal which restores control of our money and laws; which maintains access to the largest free trading network in the world; and which strengthens the position of a new Global Britain as she seeks to become the global premier of free and fair trade.

Brexit was never panacea nor plague in and of itself, as much as the opposing factions liked to claim. It is as much what happens after Brexit that will determine the success of the project as the process of Brexit itself. What was necessary first was to find a Brexit deal which would fulfil the will of the 52% whilst addressing the concerns of the 48; bring our country together rather than tearing it apart; assure the place of Scotland and Northern Ireland in the union; safeguard the economy and our business and trade; and allow us to engage with Europe on our own terms as an independent trading nation, rather than as a component of the EU bloc.

The deal that the government proposes tonight is a good deal for Britain. It effectively manages the risks of Brexit whilst maximising the opportunities of the same. It unites where so many have sought to divide. It lays a foundation for a future in which Britain can move past debates over Europe, and instead consider our wider place in the world. It fulfils the promise made to our most deprived communities, and protects the interests of those whose families and businesses depend on free trade.

It is the only deal possible. And I say to members across the House that the vote here in a few hours is the final stand for Britain. It is either this deal or no deal; this solution or an open-ended question. If the House passes this deal, we will wake up on October 1st as a newly liberated country; at ease with ourselves and at ease with our European friends. If the House fails to pass this deal, we will awaken on October 1st to a probable economic meltdown; to a crashing pound, to falling stocks, to gridlock at Dover and to a country that is diminished in the eyes of the world. It is time that this House learned how to keep its promises. It is time to get this done.

Fy Nghymru annwyl, yr hyn yr wyf wedi'i wneud yr wyf wedi'i wneud i chi.

I commend this motion to the House.
Rt Hon. Mrs Juliet Manning MP
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Ashton Edwards »

Mr Speaker,

I admit that the irony is not lost to me that the Minister who used the example of Gary Lineker making personal comments related to Brexit as a justification for a sweeping restriction on the right to freedom of expression is now the same Minister asking everyone- particularly those who, like Mr Lineker, supported Remain- to get on board with this deal. This ironic change in tone is all the more striking given the pending rebellion of several backbenchers of the party opposite. I hope that it is not lost on the Minister as well.

But to this deal that we have at hand. I say this new deal because, as the Minister remembers, this House has already voted on a different Brexit that this deal now seeks to overturn while also solving the problem of the future relationship. Entire swaths of both the Withdrawal Agreement and the promises made about the future of Britain have been rendered obsolete; yet one thing remains the same: the threat that if we don’t have this, we’ll have a hard Brexit.

One thing that makes this difficult, as the Minister herself has mentioned, is the changing red lines. Before, there seemed to be a desire to remain in the Single Market; however, that promise was quickly jettisoned by the Right Honourable Member for Maidenhead who, in 2017, vowed that we would not be a part of the Single Market. That promise was reiterated time and again

The Minister may remember that as she was a Junior Minister and later, a Minister in the Cabinet Office, when that promise was made.

But we should see where this leaves us.

First, the Minister is correct when she states that this deal would remove us from the Common Fisheries Policy and the Common Agricultural Policy. Pretty much any deal would have done that. But this deal does in fact pull us out of those programmes; it would be wrong of me to give credit where it's earned.

Second, that is about the only area in which the Minister is correct when analysing and presenting this deal.

We are joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), joining Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein. We are also joining, if the statements made to the press are believed, the European Economic Area (EEA)- the Single Market. However, contrary to the Minister’s statement, Switzerland is not a part of the EEA; rather, they have negotiated separate agreements that regulate that economic and political relationship. This is the path that we thought we were taking, this is the path we could have taken, but it is not the same as what we are doing now. We're accepting the Single Market through the EEA, as-is.

Access to the Single Market comes with benefits, but it also comes with costs, both direct and indirect.

As a part of EFTA, we absolutely have to pay dues to EFTA and to the EU and we have to contribute to certain Member States. EFTA members- which will include the UK- contribute to the economic and social development of countries that need it. Currently the beneficiary states include Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.

And as part of EFTA, we absolutely have to pay the EU directly for the operation and administration of programmes that we will be a part of. Some of these are optional, such as Erasmus. I note the Minister mentioned that the UK would continue to participate in Erasmus in a statement on Twitter; if this is to be true, we will have to contribute financially to the EU in order to participate in this program. Others are less optional; EFTA countries participate in a number of EU initiatives based on decisions by the overarching EEA Joint Committee, which oversees the implementation of the EEA.

Now, the Minister told this very House that there are no special provisions for the United Kingdom, so there are organisations that we will be participating in and, by extension, have to pay for. This includes the European Food Safety Authority. The European Banking Authority. The European Environment Agency. The European Medicines Agency. There are others, which I imagine will be shared by the Minister in due course.

Norway has to pay a fee of about £700 million each year to the EU; with our GDP being 7 times higher, we could expect our own bill to be something like £5 billion each year. Now I know the Minister will be able to give me a more accurate figure- and it may be less than this- but it is by no means a sum of zero.

The Minister has stated that we are no longer under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Mr Speaker, that is also not entirely accurate.

With respect to the operation of the EEA and EFTA, we are subject to two institutions which are not quite the same as their EU counterparts, but which interact with them and take guidance from them: the EFTA Surveillance Authority, which oversees the implementation of EU laws relating to competition and the Single Market, and the EFTA Court which will decide on actions of this Surveillance Authority.

This EFTA Court must and does use ECJ case law in its decisions, particularly where that case law relates again to issues around competition and the Single Market. Both the EFTA Court and the ECJ have agreed and worked towards homogeneity in their decisions and approach given the need to have a strong foundation for the Single Market.

And if a dispute were to arise between the UK and an EU member, that dispute may very well find its way to the ECJ if the issue relates to EU rules. So to say we are totally free of the ECJ is partially- but not entirely- accurate.

Even on the issues of an independent trade policy is an issue where there is an asterisk, where there is a “but” which requires more. We can negotiate agreements with other countries, yes, since EFTA is merely a trade arrangement rather than a political entity.

But those agreements can’t jeopardize the Single Market. Rules about product standards, about competition; we are locked in to decisions that are made by the EU.

Indeed, by accepting the Single Market, we are still at the mercy of EU decisions relating to the operation of the Single Market. The rules are made by the EU, and then adapted by the EEA; the EFTA Surveillance Authority will be there to make sure we adapt those rules into our own legislation.

EFTA countries, which the UK will become, get an informal say in the early stages, but we have no way of using our weight to stop new regulations from being made that affect us and that we will have to follow eventually.

I note that one of the important rallying cries of those who campaigned for and those that voted for Brexit is omitted by the Minister’s speech. I speak of the issue of “taking back our borders.”

In her press conference on this new Brexit, the Minister said that we would be free to regulate immigration from non-EEA countries; in this statement, the issue is avoided entirely.

And that is because, Mr Speaker, under the EEA agreement, freedom of movement still applies for EEA countries. EEA also requires our social security regime with other EEA countries so that it is open and accessible by eligible migrants. We lose our ability to control migration from the EU, completely and wholly, particularly compared to the deal that this House voted on just one year ago.

Prior to the referendum, net migration from the EU topped 200,000 people annually. That number fell following- no doubt those who were waiting to see what the relationship would be like now. Our new arrangement presented by the Government hangs a welcome sign to those that have waited… and those who will be allowed in by nature of our participation in the EEA.

Another area omitted is the status of Northern Ireland.

While we will have some issues resolved by joining the SIngle Market, that will not resolve everything. The EEA is not a customs union, which means our shipments to the EU through Northern Ireland are subject to customs checks. That’d be the same if we were sending goods across the Channel to France or through the North Sea. Paperwork needs to be verified, products inspected to make sure that we do not become a route for smuggling.

The Minister has promoted this deal as allowing us to eliminate the Northern Ireland Protocol. We can’t… not if we want to avoid some way of having a harder border than we do now.

Mr Speaker,

The message that we must pass this or risk a no-deal Brexit is a message that we hear, loud and clear. And this deal is better than a no-deal Brexit.

It gives us certainty where we would have none otherwise.

It gives us a reliable mechanism that, as the Minister says rightly, we used to be a part of.

And it takes away a continued “seat-of-your pants” negotiating style that this Government seems to be using in this case.

But let’s also be clear that this is a political decision as well. This Government is seeking to change the deal and hold it over the heads of this country in the same way that the last deal was last year.

This Government is looking now to appear as though it’s holding an olive branch out to those they have happily demonised in order to stave off a crippling rebellion in their ranks. A rebellion that may include the current Minister for Public Services and Social Affairs, who called the last deal “Brexit In Name Only,” and who preferred a no-deal Brexit to the last deal that this House voted on.

The cost of a no-deal Brexit has been made clear, so I don’t need to repeat that. Unlike the current Minister for Public Services and Social Affairs, I would not prefer a no-deal Brexit to this current deal, given the major impacts that would be felt across every sector of our economy, across every community in the United Kingdom, by every family that is looking to this House for leadership.

We would rather see something like this to provide Britain with a measure of stability than see this Government try to navigate no-deal.

But hopefully, this Government can actually be clear on what they’re delivering too. Because there is a lot of work that needs to be done.
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Juliet Manning MP »

Mr Speaker,

For the purposes of clarity, which the honourable gentleman’s statement was rather lacking, will he be supporting this deal or not?
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Ashton Edwards »

Mr Speaker,

I apologise if the Minister feels that my statements weren’t clear enough. In my attempt to force the Government to provide some clarity- the real role of the Opposition, not to blindly support the Government’s position, it appears that my statement on position wasn’t bolded enough.

I have said, Mr Speaker, that this is a bad deal. That this deal requires a lot of explanation as to what it actually means. But I have also said that it is better than no deal.

I figured that the Government would pick up on that line, perhaps run with it… because that is this Government’s messaging right now.

This Government has abandoned pretty much every publicly-announced position on Brexit. They have even dropped from their own sales pitch the core concepts that attracted people to Brexit in the first place: control over our own immigration policies. There’s been no mention of that now.

In fact the only thing this Government does say is “well, this is better than nothing.” Which I believe, if the Minister wishes to review my statement, I’ve said at least twice. Sure, I wasn’t as deflated about that position as the Government has been recently.

This Government can’t even be bothered to respond to the legitimate concerns raised by me, by others in Parliament, and by the public about this deal. About how we are still going to be paying money to the EU. About how we are still going to be a rule taker rather than a rule maker when it comes to our economy. About how this is going to impact the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland with respect to customs issues. About how we will have ZERO- repeat ZERO- control of immigration between EEA states and the UK.

No, this Government has resorted to what amounts to “well, you need to vote for this or you want no deal.”

I understand the Minister’s reluctance to face real scrutiny. In her efforts to gag the press- a press which could very well be champions of this deal were it not for fear of the new Broadcasting Standards Authority- there was no effort to respond to Parliamentary criticism there. So why would it be the same here?

The fact is, Mr Speaker, this bill is not a bit of diplomatic minutiae. This bill is going to affect every man, woman, and child in the United Kingdom in some way or another. And this Government is making sure that they are the ones that pay the price.

It’s the farmers of the United Kingdom who, being told they’re free with the UK out of the CAP, who are going to have no ability to change how they operate because they’ll still be under the rules of the EU in food production that are necessary for the functioning of the Single Market

It’s the businesses of the High Street that will still be forced to use employment rules from the EU and required to accept product standards written in Brussels.

It’s the families who have rightfully been concerned about immigration who will have to see as this Government just shrugs and says “sorry, well at least it’s not no deal.”

The Minister doesn’t have to pay the cost. The Government doesn’t have to care- and clearly they don’t- about those that voted for Brexit seeing every promise either broken completely or bent almost to the breaking point so that this Government can be seen as a deal-maker.

It makes me sad to see that’s how this issue has been treated. The voices of the British people don’t matter anymore, as the Minister goes to the press and plays her own version of Project Fear on the deal. As this Government says “vote for this deal, opposition, or else.”

So I will say it again. This is a bad deal. It ignores the concerns of pretty much everyone, and now the Government is trying to do the same.

But it’s better than nothing. Particularly the sort of nothing we’d have to try to navigate with this Government in charge.
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Ashton Edwards »

Mr. Speaker,

For the purposes of clarity for this House, will the Minister make another statement on this deal to address some of the valid concerns that have been raised throughout the country?

Will the Minister make another statement in attempt to actually explain why this a strong deal that represents all sides rather than a desire to just sort of take the easy route and push people with concerns aside?

Will the Minister engage in debate, or is she waiting for the vote?
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Ege »

Mr Speaker,

When this horrendous deal was announced, I was shocked, this is against everything we believe in as a party. If members from my former side of the House is shocked by this expression, I will point them to the Conservative and Unionist Party Manifesto page 36, I want to read it quote by quote

(raises a copy of printed Conservative manifesto with clear visuals of it)

“As we leave the European Union, we will no longer be members of the single market or customs union but we will seek a deep and special partnership including a comprehensive free trade and customs agreement”

Mr Speaker, every single Conservative MP in the government benches elected on a pledge to leave the Single Market. Every single one of them and I can hear some in those benches calling me a traitor but Mr.Speaker, my response is simple, I am the one who is keeping the promise I made and I am not the one who is violating our manifesto that we elected upon and frankly Mr.Speaker this is a betrayal of our promises and commitments made the Brexit campaign. Foreign Secretary rightfully tweeted about the 350 million pounds per week for the NHS as promises kept. This is a simple admission that promises made by the leave campaign are valid and accepted by the government even without the whole manifesto pledge. The leave campaign campaigned upon and pledged to take control of our immigration back. Mr.Speaker, this pledge was about reining in uncontrolled and ever expansive EU migration into our country and being able to set limits into EU migration, under this deal we won’t be able to take back control of our rules we are forgoing of that as well Mr.Speaker.

Once again Mr Speaker, this government and Conservative MPs who are willing to vote for this budget breaking another manifesto pledge. Mr Speaker, this may sound like a bit like a classroom teacher but I frankly feel like the government benches do need it right now. Let’s turn to the page 55 of the Conservative manifesto (shakes the manifesto at hand). Let’s read: “Leaving the European Union means, for the first time in decades, that we will be able to control immigration from the European Union too. We will therefore establish an immigration policy that allows us to reduce and control the number of people who come to Britain from the European Union, while still allowing us to attract the skilled workers our economy needs.”

Mr. Speaker, our manifesto makes it clear that one of the biggest indicators of leaving the European Union would be that we would finally be able to control immigration from the European Union and Mr.Speaker, we are failing at that. The Conservative Party, Mr.Speaker is failing at standards of leaving the EU established by both the leave campaign and the Conservative Party itself, Mr. Speaker and for me that is just appalling.

Norway’s contributions to the EU are Mr. Speaker around 115 euros per head per year and when we do a simple math with it the cost of these contributions to the EU Mr.Speaker would be around 7.66 billion pounds per year which Mr.Speaker compared to our net contributions to the EU which I would like to quote ONS on “The UK's annual five-year average (2014 to 2018) net contribution on this wider basis was £7.8 billion”. Mr Speaker that is around 117 euros per head which Mr.Speaker you can’t even buy a pint of beer in most places around the UK. Now Mr.Speaker, I think everyone knows where this is leading, let’s turn to page 36 of Conservative Manifesto again. “The principle, however, is clear: the days of Britain making vast annual contributions to the European Union will end.” Mr. Speaker, we are in violation of another Conservative manifesto pledge and Mr.Speaker, when I comb through the manifesto I find more and more of these violations but I will not take time of this parliament to go through all of them even though it seems like this is the first time many of the frontbenchers including the Prime Minister and Foreign Secretary looking at what they have gotten elected on.

Mr.Speaker, what we are debating right now is basically partial entrance back into the EU but with even worse conditions and rights. We will lose the little control and input we have had in the past won’t get any sort of control and input into what is being legislated down to us, this is in fact what the Norwegians call as the “fax democracy”. The EU faxes or mostly likely these days emails the rules from Brussels, they implement it into the law. No feedback, no input, just they accept it as it is. Mr.Speaker, Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg stated it quite frankly, Why would you want our EU deal? And frankly I ask that question every single day ever since this government announced Norway deal as an option out of nowhere. Mr.Speaker, I want to end my speech with a simple question to my friends at the Conservative Party benches, why would we want a deal which betrays our manifesto, one that we get no control over the rules that will be passed upon the UK and surrender even more control to the EU?
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

Post by Dr. James Webster »

Mr. Speaker,

I’d like to start by reading an excerpt from the 2017 Tory Manifesto. “We will get on with the job and take Britain out of the European Union. We will restore the public finances and maintain economic stability. We will reduce and control immigration.” Do you know what this deal does, Mr. Speaker? It doesn’t get the job done. It doesn’t restore our public finances, it doesn’t give us control of our borders, and it doesn't allow Britain to control immigration. Do you know what this deal is? It's a way to back door us back into the European Union, by holding a gun to our heads of every member of this Parliament. Mr. Speaker, make no mistake, coming out of the deal agreed to by the Member from Maidenhead without an agreement on the future relationship, would be an absolute disaster that will leave millions poorer; however that shouldn't be the pretense for the Government to completely reverse course on Brexit.

Mr. Speaker this Government has decided to hold the future of every Briton hostage to do the very thing the Member from Maidenhead stated wouldn’t happen under a Tory Government. In the very launch of her leadership campaign she said: “Brexit means Brexit. And we’re going to make a success of it. There will be no attempts to remain inside the EU, no attempts to rejoin it by the back door and no second referendum.” The sheer audacity to give this Parliament a choice between effectively rejoining the European Union, and millions becoming poorer overnight with no word from the British public is an absolute disgrace. They should do what’s right, and call an election and run on their future relationship.

Until earlier this week there was a deal that was passed by Parliament, one that would allow us control of our borders, one that would end payments to the European Union, one that would still have us leave the Common Agriculture Policy and the Common Fisheries Policy. Mr. Speaker, this government had one year to arrive at a deal on the future relationship but instead apparently spent that year negotiating a new Brexit deal. The Tories have engaged in an electoral bait and switch, with the number of broken promises increasing by the day. The British public deserve better than this dodgy government that cannot even be bothered to show up in Parliament to defend their Brexit deal. It’s just a simple “accept this or else.”

Mr. Speaker, this Government’s constant neglect of it’s duties to debate in Parliament, and not on twitter is an absolute shame. Is the Prime Minister himself so ashamed of this deal to not show up in person to defend it? Are you all that smug to assume that Britain will just accept this because you put a gun to their head? This Government’s contempt for Parliament on every single issue is frankly insulting, and a degradation on our democratic institutions. The front bench of the Government's smug silence on this deal is deafening. Over 24 hours with not even a single mention in defense of their deal should be all the words you need to know. This Government has given Parliament no choice, and has decided that they are also simultaneously not responsible to sell this deal. Britain will remember this.

Mr. Speaker, I want to take a moment and focus explicitly on the Prime Minister’s overall parliamentary silence on the bill. Instead choosing to spend his time arguing on Twitter. Stating today: “Seen a lot from Labour about a Brexit deal, but it's been 4 years and they've yet to offer a proper alternative that the EU would agree with” oddly enough the current Government had their own deal and they completely scrapped it. He has made no comments as to why they scrapped that deal Parliament already approved. No comments on why he is betraying the mandate of his Government. Nothing but pure smug silence. Mr. Speaker, when this deal passes because this government refuses to seek out alternatives nor call an election and get the will of the people known. Britain will remember who failed to deliver Brexit for them. They will remember which party overturned the will of the people.

With a heavy heart, I will vote for this deal. Because I cannot go back to my constituency and say I choose to make people poorer. However, I will make sure that everyone remembers who forced that choice between leaving the EU and poverty for millions. I am sure that it makes this Government happy to know that Macron and Merkel are smugly happy about the deal this government negotiated. In the future Europe knows that going forward the Tories are willing to give away everything to stay in the Single Market, and Britain knows the Tories will betray their promises. When this motion passes it will not be a day of celebration but a day of reckoning at the sheer betrayal this Government has made against the British Public.

Mr. Speaker, I make one final call to this Government, if the Prime Minister is serious about wanting to know Labour’s alternative is he should get an extension from Europe and use it to call an election. We’ll show him what kind of Brexit we will deliver for Britain. One that allows us to control our borders, and ends payments to Europe. One that will actually deliver what people voted for instead of a back door way back into Europe. However, the fact that they will not do that but instead insist on giving the choice to all of us to choose poverty or choose leaving the EU officially. This Government has committed the ultimate betrayal of the will of the British Public, and I believe many of them will not forget that.
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Re: MS-X | Brexit Deal

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DIVISION! CLEAR THE LOBBY!
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