Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Misuse of Drugs Act 1991
#1
Mr. Speaker, 

I rise to present the Misuse of Drugs Act 1991. 

The sale of illegal drugs in The United Kingdom is a major threat to the health, safety, and wellbeing of every British person. Their use, and the addiction that nearly almost follows, is a national tragedy. The growing threat that illegal drugs pose to British society warrants a powerful, swift response. The Government is committed to meeting this challenge head on, using the full force of the law and our authority to overcome it. This legislation, Mr. Speaker, is the embodiment of our commitment. 

The scourge of illegal drugs is like a multi-headed hydra: if you only manage to strike one of the heads, rather than at the core of the beast, you'll fail to truly defeat it. That is why the Government is taking a multi pronged approach, rooted in three key strategies. The legislation lays out those strategies, focusing on cracking down on those who sell drugs, mandating state authorized rehabilitation for individuals convicted of drug possession, and offering a compassionate second chance to youth offenders. This legislation represents the Government's renewed, iron clad commitment to having absolutely zero tolerance for criminals who sell illegal drugs. At the same time, it marks a significant evolution in the way in which this Government seeks to handle drug addiction, by acknowledging the role public health should play in the criminal justice system. 

So first, we are enshrining into law the Government's zero tolerance policy for some of the most serious, dangerous criminals in The United Kingdom: those that sell illegal drugs. I say that not in attempt to dramatize the situation, Mr. Speaker, but because I mean it. Because the fact of the matter is that the sale of illegal narcotics is not a victimless crime. The victims, Mr. Speaker, are the countless people who purchase illegal drugs and become addicted, develop life long health issues, and in many instances, die. The Government's response is clear: with this legislation, we are raising the maximum sentence that courts can impose on individuals convicted of selling Class A, B, and C controlled substances. We're also, for the first time, introducing mandatory minimum sentences for individuals convicted of illegally selling controlled substances. With this decision, we are sending a powerful message: if you sell drugs, you will wind up serving jail term in every instance. No exceptions. 

Second, the legislation implements a new procedure by making the release of drug offenders conditional upon their agreement to enter state mandated rehabilitation. Offenders who were convicted of the possession of controlled substances who are granted parole, or who are rewarded early release, will have their parole or release be conditional upon their willingness to enter a rehabilitation program. The Government recognizes that when an offender is released back into society, that it is in the interests of every British person that their return is as successful as possible. Reducing the rate of recidivism is vital, because it alleviates the burden placed on the taxpayer for having to finance the care of additional prisoners while simultaneously increasing the number of productive members of British society. For the justice system to grant parole or early release for an individual serving a sentence for drug possession, they must show a willingness to take responsibility for their past behavior and take meaningful steps to ensure they don't repeat it. On the Government's end, we're prepared to assist them in taking that responsibility, and will facilitate the mandated rehabilitation program.  

And finally, this legislation marks the introduction of Drug Treatment and Testing Orders, or DTTOs, for youth offenders. Drug use is a horrible thing, but it is even worse when the user is a young person. Young people are impressionable and often lack the information they need to make the right decisions, which makes them particularly susceptible to drug dealers and other influences that would motivate them to use drugs. Rather than see them serve jail time, and potentially continue to lead a life of crime for the indefinite future, the Government has decided that we need to intervene. It is my position, and the position of the Government, that young people should be offered a second chance to make up for their mistake, reject a life of crime, and realize their full potential. That is why our legislation empowers Courts to offer youth offenders a DTTO instead of serving jail time. The DTTO would require youth offenders, ages 10-18, to partake in a full-time rehabilitation program as an alternative to serving their original sentence. The DTTO will be an option offered to every youth offender convicted of either the possession or sale of Class A, B, and/or C controlled substances.   

The use of illegal drugs robs innocent people of their full potential. It tears apart families, undermining the most critical facet of British society. And it endangers communities, plunging neighborhoods into violence and uncertainty. The Government believes that enough is enough, and we introduce this legislation as a powerful first step to address this problem at its root. It is my privilege to commend this legislation to the House, and I humbly ask that it be read a second time.


Messages In This Thread
Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by William Summer - 07-22-2020, 03:24 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Vivian Rook - 07-24-2020, 12:06 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Blakesley - 07-24-2020, 01:36 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Marcus Redgrave - 07-24-2020, 10:41 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by William Summer - 07-30-2020, 08:48 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Marcus Redgrave - 07-30-2020, 09:16 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by William Summer - 08-05-2020, 02:27 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Ruan Preston - 08-07-2020, 09:21 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by William Summer - 08-10-2020, 02:55 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Redgrave - 08-10-2020, 09:06 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Roger Brigham - 08-10-2020, 09:23 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Max Power - 08-10-2020, 09:38 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Amelia Lockhart - 08-10-2020, 10:10 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Vivian Rook - 08-10-2020, 10:12 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Brown - 08-11-2020, 12:59 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by William Summer - 08-11-2020, 01:05 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Quinn Shaw - 08-11-2020, 01:30 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Tommy Dawson - 08-12-2020, 12:43 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Nicholas Eden - 08-12-2020, 08:16 AM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Ruth Murphy - 08-12-2020, 06:01 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Henry Carpenter - 08-13-2020, 07:31 PM
RE: Misuse of Drugs Act 1991 - by Redgrave - 08-17-2020, 10:11 PM

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)