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The Mail
#1
Right wing tabloid posing as a serious paper
Steve | A-Team
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#2
THERE REALLY IS ONLY ONE LOONY LEFT - SURELY LABOUR CAN'T BE THAT  STUPID?

Arise, Comrade Sir James! It's fast approaching that time again when the Labour Party has a conversation with itself to pick who can be chosen as the next apostle to the British public, the fluffy 'moderate' face of what is actually at heart a hard socialist agenda that would make Britain poorer at home, and feeble abroad. 

Only this time they seem to seriously be contemplating appointing The Right Honourable Sir James McCrimmon QC as next General Secretary, a man who makes Clem Attlee look positively revisionist, and who has promised to emanate heroes from the eastern bloc by 'purging' his party of 'moderates'. I think the Russian term you're looking for is Kulak, eh Comrade? We really thought that after three tub thumping electoral defeats Labour couldn't sink any lower, but we do hand it to Sir James - he'll put Spitting Image out of business in absolutely no time.

This champagne socialist Knight of the Realm, like most of Labour's Union Barons and North London intelligentsia Guardian-reading supporters - is a HYPOCRITE. He claims that he has only earned a maximum of fifty thousand pounds a year, and wait for it - not content with the filthy proceeds of the bourgeois economic cycle, owns TWO flats - but as Sir James himself claims, it's alright because one is rented out. You couldn't make it up!

If this ban the bomb hug a homo Trotskyite loon gets anywhere near a position of power - then we might as well call the 1992 election off, because let's face it - anybody who hasn't been sectioned under the Mental Health Act wouldn't dream of voting for this clown.
Max | A Team
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#3
Thatcher "regrets" Budget choices in leaked private statements

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The former Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, told a private lunch that she "regretted" the choices made by the Prime Minister and Chancellor in their Budget. Multiple sources at the lunch, which the newly ennobled Baroness Thatcher hosted at Westminster for various former allies from politics and the media, confirmed that the former Prime Minister had less than kind words to say about the Budget and the suspension of the poll tax.

One source told us:

"She was quite clearly livid, seeing the Budget as a repudiation of everything that she had worked to achieve in office. She was cutting about the amount of borrowing - who's going to pay all that back, she asked - and about the huge interventions in industry. She had a general view that the Government had no backbone and had given in to 'socialist rabble rousing and trouble making'. She was very depressed about the state of the Conservative Party, and not because of Russian spies."

The former Prime Minister's office has declined to comment.
Steve | A-Team
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#4
Ignore the Europhiles, Saxon's our man
Former Environment Secretary is the only candidate who will stand up for Britain

By Paul Dacre

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With all the fallout from the failure of the Maastricht motions in Parliament, only one Conservative figure came out with any credibility, namely former Environment Secretary Harry Saxon. 

For whatever people may say about the timing of Saxon's resignation from Cabinet and his decision against Maastricht, what matters is that Saxon stood up for his country when it mattered. He stood up against a dangerous deal that poses a real threat to our currency and our sovereignty, a form of covert European integration that will leave Britain weaker rather than stronger, despite the protestations of ministers more concerned with claiming a win than actually realising what they negotiated. 

It is therefore with great pleasure that the Daily Mail endorses Harry Saxon to be the next Prime Minister.

Saxon will return us to the days of Maggie when the Conservatives actually stood for freedom, prosperity and opportunity, the kind of Britain where hard work is rewarded and those who want to succeed are able to. The Conservatives have been let down by the crimes of Drummond-Macbeath and the weak dithering of Aubyn Myerscough, putting the party into its current difficulties.

You also only need to look at the figures criticising Saxon over Maastricht, notably the disgraced Euphemia Fournier-Macleod, to know that he is the man who will upset all the right people. If Britain is to move forward, we need to jettison the hangers-on and the non-entities of the Myerscough year to bring back a dynamic, vibrant Thatcherite government that can send Sir James and his mob packing come June.
Redgrave | A-Team
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#5
Under Conservative leadership, Britain stands tall
 
Just months ago there were severe questions over the future of the Conservative and Unionist Party. Blatant opportunism over the Maastricht question threatened to fracture our conservative, capitalist, and unionist cause. Doubts over the future of conservatism reigned in Westminster and across the country.
 
Today, such doubts can be laid to rest. Under this government, conservatism is alive and Britain, once again, has the strong leadership that she requires.
 
The European question was deftly handled: there will be no acceding to a European currency, no abandonment of sterling, without the consent of the British people. Through our investments in rebuilding and democracy on the continent, Britain stands to be at the forefront of a Europe whole and free. It is our imperative to use this position to drive for a freer world: a world that espouses freedom from tyranny, freedom of speech, and freedom of trade. These are inherently conservative values that we can, and must, lead Europe in adopting and exporting to the world.
 
Our place at the forefront of Europe and our bonds of heritage and language with the United States and Canada secure Britain an additional duty: serving as the beating heart of the transatlantic alliance. We must continue to hold this mantle with the strengthening of NATO, the building of transatlantic trade ties, and investment in future interoperability of our armed forces. Our critical role in the transatlantic community was no doubt highlighted by the support our allies rightly provided us in the conflict with Argentina. A firm commitment to maintaining that role, an absolute commitment to NATO and the transatlantic alliance, is a prerequisite for any government of the United Kingdom.
 
The test of Argentine aggressing was met decisively. Faced with a despotic government that sought for the second time in a decade to wage a war of aggression against the United Kingdom, the British Armed Forces demonstrated the capacity of our nation to defend our people, our territory, and our sovereignty. While we mourn the brave airmen that gave their lives in defence of the realm, we now take up the mantle of bringing peace, democracy, and order to South America. When tested by a foe that sought to deny Britain prosperity and sought to break apart our nation, this government and this nation faced the challenge and succeeded.
 
That is the record of modern conservatism in Britain.
 
There may be those who say that the defectors are a conservative force in Britain. They are wrong. They stand only for personal gain. They are “led” by those whom, when the duty to lead was thrust upon them, shrank from the challenge. They defile the reputation and needs of our veterans and seek to distract with meaningless bluster. That is not conservatism. That is cowardice.
 
The same cannot be said of the government that led the way in preserving and demonstrating Britain’s strength abroad. To secure the future of Britain, we must continue to lead in Europe, to lead in the world. We must defend our values, our enterprise, and our sovereignty – even in the most far flung corners of the globe. Whether in Brussels or Buenos Aires, this government has proven that it is more than up to the task, that the blue flame of freedom shines bright.
 
In the words of the Countess of Finchley: once again, Britain stands tall in the councils of Europe and the world.
 
Caroline Blakesley is the Secretary of State for Education and Employment, a member of the No Turning Back Group, and the MP for Chertsey and Walton.
Redgrave | A-Team
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